Archive for the 'Culinary Canvas' Category

Culinary Canvas: Lavender Cookies

Lavender is a plant prized for its healing properties, pleasant fragrance, and–particularly in France–its unique flavor. Fragrant purple fields of these flowers can be found across the south of France, especially in the Provence region. Van Gogh moved from Paris to this area in 1888, to the ancient city of Arles. One September evening, he set up his easel on the square and painted the cafe, which he later translated into this reed pen drawing from the Museum’s Reves Collection. I think these delicate lavender cookies would be the perfect treat to enjoy while sipping a café au lait at this charming spot.

1985.R.79

Vincent Van Gogh, Café Terrace on the Place du Forum, 1888, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection.

Lavender Cookies

Yields about 60 cookies
Level: Easy

2 teaspoons dried lavender, chopped or ground
1 cup sugar
2½ cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup shortening
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
½ teaspoon almond extract
1 egg plus 2 egg yolks, room temperature

Preheat oven to 375° F. Line rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, stir together lavender and sugar. Set aside for a few minutes, allowing lavender to infuse. In a separate bowl, stir together flour, baking powder and salt.

Add shortening and butter to lavender sugar and beat at medium speed until light. Add almond extract, then slowly incorporate eggs, mixing well until combined. Slowly add dry ingredients to mixer, stirring on low speed and scraping down sides of bowl until fully incorporated.

Using a tablespoon scoop, drop dough onto prepared baking sheets. Bake 9-11 minutes until tops begin to crinkle.

When removed from oven, cookies will look soft and should remain so at room temperature. Allow to cool slightly on baking sheet then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.

Note: Dried lavender can usually be found in the bulk area of specialty grocery stores.

 
Lavender Cookies

Recipe adapted from Taste of Home.

Sarah Coffey
Education Coordinator

Culinary Canvas: Mango Blueberry Puree

Last week, my little guy and I attended Art Babies. We started the class in our exhibition, Between Action and the Unknown: The Art of Kazuo Shiraga and Sadamasa Motonaga, exploring the large, abstract works of art. He smiled and kicked his little feet, so I could tell he really enjoyed the bright and engaging colors!

Rhys_SM

Color is something that I’ve been thinking about a lot when it comes to his diet–the more colorful the better! As you might have expected, I enjoy making food for him at home, so I wanted to share a simple recipe that you could try, inspired by the deep and vibrant colors in the exhibition. Be sure to bring your little one on your next visit, then make some colorful food for him or her to enjoy at home–you’ll be feeding his body and his mind! If you’re brave, you might even let him paint his high chair tray–at least you’ll know the paint is safe to eat!

Sadamasa Motonaga, Work 66-1, 1966, oil and synthetic resin on canvas, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo © 2015 Estate of Motonaga Sadamasa

Sadamasa Motonaga, Work 66-1, 1966, oil and synthetic resin on canvas, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo © 2015 Estate of Motonaga Sadamasa

Mango Blueberry Puree

Yields about 16 ounces
Appropriate for 8+ months
Level: Very Easy

1 ripe mango
1 cup fresh or frozen organic blueberries

Prepare the mango by cutting it around the skin, similar to how you would cut an avocado. Note that the pit can be a bit tricky, so do your best to remove it, separating the fruit into two halves. Using a knife, score the fruit up to the skin, being careful not to cut through it. Scoop out fruit pieces and juice, and add to saucepan set on medium-low heat. Add fresh or frozen berries to pan and lightly simmer for about 5 minutes, allowing the fruits to break down slightly and meld their flavors.

Transfer fruit to the bowl of a baby food maker, small food processor, or large measuring bowl, if using an immersion blender. Puree into desired consistency for your baby.

Divide puree into any portion size you’d like and freeze. I find that an ice cube tray works well for small portions that can be pulled out when needed and added to oatmeal, mixed with other fruits, or combined into a larger meal.



 

baby food maker

Cooked fruit in the baby food maker

blueberry mango puree

Finished puree in ice trays

Original recipe. And of course, be sure to always check with your pediatrician on the appropriate diet for your special little one.

Sarah Coffey
Education Coordinator

Culinary Canvas: Sweet Potato Pear Muffins

It’s been a while since my last recipe, so I’m happy to be back for some fall baking after my extended break (during which I welcomed a new addition)! November is one of my favorite months–not only is today my birthday, but I also love Thanksgiving and all the flavors of fall that come with it. Our painting, Mountains, No. 19, really evokes this time of year to me. The rich oranges, reds, and greens burst off the canvas, reminding me of all the wonderful, fresh produce this season has to offer. So for this recipe, I’m combining two fall favorites–sweet potatoes and pears–into one colorful bite. Happy fall!

Marsden Hartley, Mountains, no. 19, 1930, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Marsden Hartley, Mountains, no. 19, 1930, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Sweet Potato Pear Muffins

Yields about 18 Muffins
Level: Easy

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon salt
⅛ teaspoon nutmeg
1 ½ cups sweet potato puree (from about 1 large sweet potato)
6 ounces vanilla Greek yogurt, room temperature
2 eggs, beaten
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, melted
½ cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
¼ teaspoon fresh grated ginger (or ⅛ teaspoon ground ginger)
1 medium pear, peeled and diced small

Preheat oven to 375° F. Line muffin pan with paper liners if desired.

In large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg. In medium bowl, mix together sweet potato, yogurt, eggs, butter, brown sugar, vanilla and ginger until fully combined and smooth.

Add sweet potato mixture to flour mixture and stir with rubber spatula until flour is mostly incorporated. Gently fold diced pears into batter with a few revolutions, just enough to incorporate remaining flour and distribute pears evenly throughout.

Divide batter into muffin cups, filling each cup ¾ full. Bake 18-20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Allow to cool slightly in pan, then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.


 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Recipe adapted from A Cozy Kitchen.

Sarah Coffey
Education Coordinator

Culinary Canvas: Spritz Cookies

The author of this post is stepping in (just this once!) for our resident DMA baker and Culinary Canvas blogger, Sarah Coffey, whose baking talents we are all missing during her maternity leave.

Last week when the weather got toasty, I started to daydream about my favorite pseudo-holiday: Christmas in July.  Instead of donning a goofy sweater and decking the halls, I decided to mark the occasion with a trip to visit our Icebergs painting, and a little Christmas baking.  (Actually, as you’ll notice when you get down to the recipe, it was a lot of Christmas baking).  Spritz cookies, a Swedish butter cookie often baked during Christmastime, are one of my favorite holiday treats.  I love the cookie’s buttery richness, slight almond flavor, and the thumbprint full of preserves in the center.  There’s also something very satisfying about piping the dough into shapes, one by one.

The Spritz cookie recipe below is a commercial one, taken from a baking class I recently finished through El Centro Community College’s Bakery/Pastry Arts program.  The recipe’s yield is high, but since this baking adventure was inspired by the holiday spirit–and the sharing  and overeating it inspires–I thought a few extra (dozen) cookies would be a welcome thing!

Frederic Edwin Church, The Icebergs, 1861, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Norma and Lamar Hunt

Frederic Edwin Church, The Icebergs, 1861, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Norma and Lamar Hunt

Spritz cookies

Yield: pipes approximately 85 cookies

1 lb. butter
12 oz. sugar
4 oz. eggs
2 tsp almond extract
1 lb 4 oz. cake flour
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

Using the paddle attachment of a stand mixer, cream butter and sugar at low speed, blending to a smooth paste. Add eggs and almond extract in at a low speed. Sift in flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix until just combined.

Using a pastry bag and a large #5 star tip, pipe dough onto parchment sheets, garnishing tops with pieces of fruit, nuts, or preserves of any flavor. Place cookies in freezer for about 30 minutes to set shape. Put in a 350˚F oven and bake approximately 8 minutes, or until the edges are just beginning to brown.

 

Spritz cookiesAnd because this is a Friday Photo post, below are some more images of my semester of baking at El Centro!

Amy Copeland
Manager of Go van Gogh and Community Teaching Programs

 

Culinary Canvas: Almond Cookies (Nan-e Badami)

This month’s recipe is inspired by our current exhibition Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World, which explores Islamic art and science throughout the centuries and around the world. Several beautifully decorated pieces of pottery can be found in the exhibition, including this striking bowl from Kashan, located in modern Iran. The Persian Empire spanned this area during ancient times and its cultural thread has continued, influencing food in the region today. In fact, Persians were one of the first to produce sugar and create recipes for cookies–some dating back to the 12th century–and sweets remain an important part of Persian celebrations today. Try this simple Persian recipe to add an interesting new flavor to your cookie repertoire and then be sure to stop by the Museum before Nur closes next month!

Blue and White Bowl with Radial Design, 13th Century , Iran, Kashan, fritware, painted in cobalt blue under transparent glaze, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Brush, Brooklyn, USA

Blue and White Bowl with Radial Design, 13th Century , Iran, Kashan, fritware, painted in cobalt blue under transparent glaze, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Brush, Brooklyn, USA

Almond Cookies

Yields about 60 cookies
Level: Very Easy

5 egg yolks
1 ½ cups sugar
3 tablespoons rosewater (optional, can be purchased at Middle Eastern markets)
2 cups finely ground almonds or almond flour
2 teaspoons cardamom
½ teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven to 250° F. Line rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, beat yolks and sugar at medium speed until light. Add rosewater if desired.

In a separate bowl, stir together almond flour, cardamom, and baking powder. Slowly add almond mixture to mixer, stirring on low speed and scraping down sides of bowl until fully incorporated. Resulting dough should be slightly sticky.

To form cookies, scoop off about a teaspoon of dough then roll between hands to shape into a ball. Flatten ball between palms and place on baking sheet. Bake about 25 minutes, watching closely to ensure cookies do not brown.

When removed from oven, cookies will look very soft and should remain so at room temperature. Allow to cool on baking sheet then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.


 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Recipe adapted from Food of Life: A Book of Ancient Persian and Modern Iranian Cooking and Ceremonies.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Hazelnut Coffee Cake

Cakes have been around since ancient times, but what we think of as coffee cake was introduced to America during the Colonial period by European immigrants. Coffee was a favorite beverage in the new colonies, and coffee cake became a delicious accompaniment. This coffeepot from our silver collection is a lovely example of how early Americans served this ever popular drink, and perhaps a simple coffee cake would have accompanied it on a Colonial table. And in fact, we just missed National Coffee Cake Day on Monday, April 7. Even though it’s a bit late, this recipe is still sure to take the cake!

Coffeepot, c. 1780-1785, Joseph Anthony Jr., maker, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Mr. and Mrs. H. Ross Perot

Coffeepot, c. 1780-1785, Joseph Anthony Jr., maker, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Mr. and Mrs. H. Ross Perot

Hazelnut Coffee Cake

Yields 1 loaf
Level: Moderate

Topping:

¼ cup hazelnuts, finely chopped
2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon flour
Pinch of salt
1 tablespoon cold unsalted butter

Filling:

¼ cup Nutella hazelnut spread
¼ cup hazelnuts, finely chopped or ground
¼ cup mini chocolate chips

Cake:

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 eggs, room temperature
6 ounces vanilla Greek yogurt, room temperature
1 ½ cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350° F. Butter loaf pan using butter wrapper.

Topping: Stir together hazelnuts, brown sugar, flour and salt in small bowl. Using a fork, cut in cold butter until mixture forms into small crumbs with a texture resembling coarse sand. Chill until ready to use.

Filling: Combine Nutella, hazelnuts and chocolate chips. Set aside.

Cake: In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar, beating at medium speed until light. Add vanilla, then incorporate eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Add yogurt and mix until fully combined.

In another bowl, stir together flour, baking powder and salt. Add flour mixture to mixer in two batches, stirring on medium until flour is mostly combined. Remove bowl from mixer and stir by hand with rubber spatula for two revolutions to incorporate remainder. Do not over mix.

Spread half of batter into prepared pan. Cover with filling, then top with remaining batter. Run knife through batter about 3-4 times, across both length and width of pan. Smooth batter and evenly spoon on topping across the top.

Bake 30 minutes at 350° F. Reduce oven to 325° F and continue baking for 15 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.


 

Filling

Filling

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Original recipe.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Mini Blueberry Tarts

You can find this stunning silver centerpiece, created for the 1964 New York World’s Fair, on the fourth floor in our Formed/Unformed exhibition. Its delicate central shape is made up of 19 clusters that burst forth with 7 sapphires each. This month’s recipe is also studded with little blue gems, though these are of the berry variety. And while they don’t include such precious materials as our Celestial Centerpiece, these mini treats will certainly serve as the perfect centerpiece for your next party–delighting your guests with their bursting blueberry flavor!

Celestial Centerpiece, Robert J. King, 1964, Silver and spinel sapphires, Dallas Museum of Art, The Jewel Stern American Silver Collection, acquired through the Patsy Lacy Griffith Collection, gift of Patsy Lacy Griffith by exchange and gift of Jewel Stern in honor of Kevin W. Tucker

Celestial Centerpiece, 1964, Robert J. King, designer, Dallas Museum of Art, The Jewel Stern American Silver Collection, acquired through the Patsy Lacy Griffith Collection, gift of Patsy Lacy Griffith by exchange and gift of Jewel Stern in honor of Kevin W. Tucker

Mini Blueberry Tarts

Yields 30 tarts
Level: Very Easy

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
½ cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
30 frozen mini phyllo shells
1 pint fresh blueberries, rinsed and dried
Coarse sugar (optional, for sprinkling)

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, beat cream cheese and sugar at medium speed. Add vanilla extract and continue whisking until fluffy. Using a rubber spatula, transfer filling mixture to ziploc bag. Press filling into one corner, leaving enough room to hold bag without overflowing contents.

Arrange phyllo shells onto work surface. Snip corner of bag and squeeze filling into each shell, leaving space at top. Cover filling with 4-5 blueberries and sprinkle tops with coarse sugar if desired.

Refrigerate tarts in air tight container and serve chilled. Consume within 2 days.


 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Original recipe.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Meyer Lemon Mini Cupcakes

A pair of tiny gold earrings in our Ancient Mediterranean gallery was the inspiration for this month’s recipe. Of course jewelry always makes a perfect gift for Valentine’s Day, but these little beauties are particularly appropriate since they depict Eros, the Greek god and Valentine’s Day icon better known as Cupid. But if you can’t afford any ancient golden jewelry for your Valentine this year, how about whipping up some miniature golden cupcakes instead? And be sure to use Meyer lemons to make these goodies extra sweet for your sweetie!

1995_25_a_b

Eros earrings, Greek, late 4th century B.C., Dallas Museum of Art, the Cecil and Ida Green Acquisition Fund

Meyer Lemon Mini Cupcakes

Yields about 48 cupcakes
Level: Easy

Cupcakes:

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup sugar
3 large eggs, room temperature
Zest and juice of 2 Meyer lemons
6 ounces vanilla yogurt
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350° F. Line mini muffin pan with paper liners.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar, beating at medium speed until light. Add lemon zest, then incorporate eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Add lemon juice and yogurt and mix until fully combined.

In a separate bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, and salt. Slowly add flour mixture to mixer, mixing on low speed and scraping down sides of bowl until just incorporated.

Divide batter into muffin cups, using a tablespoon scoop to fill each cup ¾ full. Bake about 11 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Allow to cool completely before frosting.

Frosting:

¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
Zest and juice of 1 Meyer lemon
2 teaspoons limoncello liqueur (optional)
3 cups powdered sugar, sifted

Whip butter and cream cheese in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment on medium-high speed until creamy. Continue to mix on low while adding lemon zest, limoncello, and half the powdered sugar. Squeeze in juice from half the lemon and incorporate remaining sugar, mixing on low until combined. Add additional juice to reach desired consistency for spreading or piping.


 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Recipe adapted from Brown Eyed Baker.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Apple Pie Cupcakes

This month’s recipe is inspired by our wonderful Pointillist painting by Pissarro, Apple Harvest. I imagine this painting, like most apple picking, takes place in the fall. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t still bountiful varieties of apples to be had at this time of year–just check your local grocery store! And one of our very own McDermott Interns–whose favorite dessert is apple pie–just happened to have a birthday last week. But much like the Neo-Impressionists, I wanted to do my own thing. So I decided on an apple pie inspired cupcake, which combines apples and spice into a scrumptious handheld bite. Try these out for your next holiday get together and impress your friends with your artistic hand. Happy Holidays!

Camille Pissarro, Apple Harvest, 1888, Dallas Museum of Art, Munger Fund

Camille Pissarro, Apple Harvest, 1888, Dallas Museum of Art, Munger Fund

Apple Pie Cupcakes

Yields 24 cupcakes
Level: Moderate

Topping:

2 Jonagold (or similar) apples, diced small
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons caramel sauce (left over from last month’s recipe)

In medium saucepan, melt butter and sugar over medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Add diced apples and sauté for 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently, until apples are soft and lightly caramelized. Remove from heat and stir in caramel sauce. Set aside to cool. Note: 2 tablespoons sugar can be substituted for caramel sauce.

Cupcakes:

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla
4 eggs, room temperature
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup milk

Preheat oven to 325° F. Line muffin pan with paper liners.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and both sugars, beating at medium speed until light. Add vanilla and continue beating at medium speed. Incorporate eggs one at a time, mixing until fully combined.

In medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Beginning and ending with dry ingredients, slowly add flour mixture to mixer, alternating with milk. After each addition, mix on low speed until just incorporated, scraping down sides of bowl as needed.

Divide batter into muffin cups, filling each cup slightly more than ½ full. Bake 18-20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with sparse crumbs. Allow to cool slightly in pan, then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.

Frosting:

½ cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
½ cup shortening
2 ½ cups powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Splash of milk as needed

Beat butter and shortening in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment on medium-high speed until creamy. Add powdered sugar, vanilla, and cinnamon, mixing on low until combined. Add splash of milk and additional sugar as needed to achieve thickened, slightly firm consistency.

Assembly: Fill quart size Ziploc bag with frosting. Squeeze frosting to one corner and snip to create opening. Outline the rim of each cupcake with a line of frosting. Place a spoonful of apple filling in the middle of each cupcake. Cross filling with lines of additional frosting in a basket weave pattern, mimicking pie crust.

Store finished cupcakes in refrigerator until ready to serve.

 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Recipe adapted from Alpineberry.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

In the spirit of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, DMA staff came together yesterday to celebrate with a potluck and pie competition–which of course, yours truly had to enter. And wouldn’t you know, we have the perfect print to match: Thanksgiving. Is this what your kitchen will look like come Thursday? While it was only me in the kitchen baking pie this weekend, it sure felt this chaotic! Although I can’t say my pie was an official DMA winner, the presentation certainly did have that wow factor. And the rich chocolate flavor is bound to knock your socks off. Happy Thanksgiving!

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942,Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection, bequest of Juanita K. Bromberg

Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

Yields a 9 inch pie
Level: Moderate

Crust:

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 ½ tablespoons shortening
Scant ¼ cup cold water

Stir together salt and flour. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture forms into small crumbs. Sprinkle in just enough water to bring dough together into a ball. Flatten ball into a disk and chill in refrigerator until ready to roll out. Dough can also be made ahead and frozen until ready to use, thawing beforehand in the refrigerator.

Filling:

1 ½ cups sugar
cup flour
cup unsweetened cocoa
¾ cup butter, melted
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
3 eggs, room temperature
1 cup toasted pecans, chopped
1 pie crust

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spread pecans evenly onto sheet and toast in oven about 5-6 minutes, until nuts turn slightly darker and become fragrant. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Chop one cup and set aside the remaining halves.

Lightly flour a tea towel spread across a baking sheet. Roll out crust on floured surface to about 2 inches beyond the circumference of the pie dish. Place pie dish upside down on top of crust and, using the baking sheet as support, gently flip crust over on top of dish. Situate crust into dish, gently pressing any cracks back together.

In medium bowl, whisk together sugar, flour, and cocoa. Mix in melted butter, corn syrup, and vanilla. Add eggs one at time, mixing until fully incorporated. Stir in chopped pecans with rubber spatula. Pour filling into prepared pie dish.

Bake pie about 35 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer to metal rack to cool completely. Filling will look rather loose but will set as it cools.

Topping:

1 cup sugar
¼ cup water
½ cup heavy cream, room temperature
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
½  teaspoon sea salt
2 cups toasted pecan halves

In medium heavy bottom saucepan, stir together sugar and water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Boil for about 8 minutes, swirling pan occasionally until sugar begins to change to a dark amber color. Watch very closely to ensure sugar does not burn. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in cream and butter. Stir constantly until bubbling stops and butter is fully incorporated. Whisk in sea salt. Set aside to cool slightly.

Once pie has cooled, arrange remaining pecan halves on top, beginning with the outer rim and working inward. Pour warm caramel topping over pecans, covering entire pie in an even layer. Lightly sprinkle with fancy sea salt flakes if desired.

 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Crust recipe courtesy my mom. Pie recipe adapted from Southern Living.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives


Follow Uncrated via Email

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,612 other subscribers

Archives

Twitter Updates

Flickr Photo Stream

Categories