Posts Tagged 'chocolate'

Culinary Canvas: Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

In the spirit of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, DMA staff came together yesterday to celebrate with a potluck and pie competition–which of course, yours truly had to enter. And wouldn’t you know, we have the perfect print to match: Thanksgiving. Is this what your kitchen will look like come Thursday? While it was only me in the kitchen baking pie this weekend, it sure felt this chaotic! Although I can’t say my pie was an official DMA winner, the presentation certainly did have that wow factor. And the rich chocolate flavor is bound to knock your socks off. Happy Thanksgiving!

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942,Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection, bequest of Juanita K. Bromberg

Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

Yields a 9 inch pie
Level: Moderate

Crust:

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 ½ tablespoons shortening
Scant ¼ cup cold water

Stir together salt and flour. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture forms into small crumbs. Sprinkle in just enough water to bring dough together into a ball. Flatten ball into a disk and chill in refrigerator until ready to roll out. Dough can also be made ahead and frozen until ready to use, thawing beforehand in the refrigerator.

Filling:

1 ½ cups sugar
cup flour
cup unsweetened cocoa
¾ cup butter, melted
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
3 eggs, room temperature
1 cup toasted pecans, chopped
1 pie crust

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spread pecans evenly onto sheet and toast in oven about 5-6 minutes, until nuts turn slightly darker and become fragrant. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Chop one cup and set aside the remaining halves.

Lightly flour a tea towel spread across a baking sheet. Roll out crust on floured surface to about 2 inches beyond the circumference of the pie dish. Place pie dish upside down on top of crust and, using the baking sheet as support, gently flip crust over on top of dish. Situate crust into dish, gently pressing any cracks back together.

In medium bowl, whisk together sugar, flour, and cocoa. Mix in melted butter, corn syrup, and vanilla. Add eggs one at time, mixing until fully incorporated. Stir in chopped pecans with rubber spatula. Pour filling into prepared pie dish.

Bake pie about 35 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer to metal rack to cool completely. Filling will look rather loose but will set as it cools.

Topping:

1 cup sugar
¼ cup water
½ cup heavy cream, room temperature
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
½  teaspoon sea salt
2 cups toasted pecan halves

In medium heavy bottom saucepan, stir together sugar and water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Boil for about 8 minutes, swirling pan occasionally until sugar begins to change to a dark amber color. Watch very closely to ensure sugar does not burn. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in cream and butter. Stir constantly until bubbling stops and butter is fully incorporated. Whisk in sea salt. Set aside to cool slightly.

Once pie has cooled, arrange remaining pecan halves on top, beginning with the outer rim and working inward. Pour warm caramel topping over pecans, covering entire pie in an even layer. Lightly sprinkle with fancy sea salt flakes if desired.

 
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Crust recipe courtesy my mom. Pie recipe adapted from Southern Living.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Chocolate Caramelized Banana Bread

You might have noticed this little fellow standing watch on the third floor in our Indonesian galleries. In his original Indonesian habitat, he would have adorned a clan house, on top of a tall post or beam. If he could ever find a moment to relax, I bet he could unwind nicely with a piece of this banana chocolate concoction. I mean, who doesn’t love banana bread–and this one packs a double chocolate punch!

Architectural sculpture depicting a monkey, Indonesia, late 19th-20th century, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Architectural sculpture depicting a monkey, Indonesia, late 19th-20th century, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Chocolate Caramelized Banana Bread

Yields 1 loaf
Level: Easy

3 tablespoons unsalted butter
¾ cup packed brown sugar
3 very ripe bananas, sliced
6 ounces plain yogurt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons bourbon
2 eggs, room temperature
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
½ cup cocoa
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup chocolate chips (optional)

Preheat oven to 350° F. Spray loaf pan with cooking spray.

Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add brown sugar and sliced bananas. Sauté until mixture is melted and nicely caramelized, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

In medium bowl, whisk together yogurt, oil, and bourbon. Add eggs one at a time, whisking until fully incorporated. In separate bowl, mix together flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt.

Place cooled banana mixture In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment and beat at medium speed until smooth. Beginning and ending with dry ingredients, add flour mixture to mixer, alternating with yogurt mixture. After each addition, mix on low speed until just incorporated. Remove bowl from mixer and stir in chocolate chips by hand with rubber spatula if desired.

Scrape batter into loaf pan. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with moist crumbs.

 

caramelizing the bananas

caramelizing the bananas

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Recipe adapted from Cooking Light.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Peanut Butter Eggs

Continuing our Easter egg theme this week, I wanted to create a recipe that recalls the yummy Easter candy everyone enjoys at this time of year. For my inspiration, I looked to our striking Brancusi sculpture, Beginning of the World, which uses imagery associated with birth. This imagery is fitting for Easter and spring, a season of rebirth and new life. And of course, it is shaped like an egg! I am a huge fan of cake balls and this recipe not only yields a delicious result, it provides the opportunity to decorate more eggs with your family. Enjoy!

Constantin Brancusi, The Beginning of the World, c. 1920, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Clark

Constantin Brancusi, Beginning of the World, c. 1920, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Clark

Peanut Butter Eggs

Yields 50-100 cake balls, depending on size
Level: Intermediate

Cake Balls:

1 yellow cake
1 cup peanut butter frosting (recipe follows)
1 ¼ cups Reese’s Pieces candy
Coating (recipe follows)

Peanut Butter Frosting:

1 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
½ cup natural creamy peanut butter
4 tablespoons whole milk

Coating:

12-16 ounces good quality dark chocolate, coarsely chopped
½ tablespoon vegetable shortening

Prepare cake as directed, using a favorite recipe or box mix if desired. Allow cake to cool completely.

Peanut Butter Frosting: Place the powdered sugar, butter, vanilla and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until mostly combined. Add peanut butter and continue mixing, scraping down the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Increase speed to high and add milk one tablespoon at a time. Continue beating an additional 3-5 minutes, until the mixture is light and smooth. Set aside.

Cake Balls: Break up cake into bowl of food processor and process into an even crumb. Transfer cake crumbs to medium mixing bowl.

Roughly chop Reese’s Pieces candy with food processor or by hand. Add approximately 1 cup of candy to mixing bowl, reserving remainder for use as decoration. Stir to distribute candy evenly through crumbs.

Beginning with ½ cup, add frosting to crumb mixture and stir with rubber spatula. Amount of frosting needed will vary depending on moisture of original cake. Final mixture should be evenly moist but not greasy and able to hold its shape.

To form cake balls, scoop off about a teaspoon of dough then roll between hands into egg shape. Place eggs onto wax paper lined dish and transfer to freezer. Allow to firm for at least 30 minutes.

Coating: Whisk chocolate in a glass bowl set over a small pot of simmering water until mostly melted. Remove from heat and stir in shortening, whisking until smooth.

Remove half of eggs from freezer. Insert toothpick into egg and dip into coating until fully covered, allowing excess chocolate to drip off. A small espresso spoon is useful for distributing chocolate evenly over egg. Quickly sprinkle with reserved candy while still wet. Place toothpick into foam board and allow chocolate to set.

Remove remaining eggs from freezer and repeat process until complete. Once dry, remove toothpicks and refrigerate in air tight container.

 
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Original recipe utilizing cake ball tips from 52 Kitchen Adventures and Miss Candiquik.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Almond Crescents

The inspiration for this month’s recipe is a crescent-shaped tobelo, a sacred object from Indonesia used to connect with ancestral spirits. In my family, baking serves as a connector between generations, and at no time is this more true than the holiday season. In that spirit, be sure to bake this crescent-shaped cookie with your family and let everyone explore their artistic side with the decorations!

2008_65

Crescent-shaped ornament (tobelo), 19th Century, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Nasher Foundation in honor of Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher

Almond Crescents

Yields about 60 cookies
Level: Easy

Cookies:

1 cup blanched slivered almonds, lightly toasted
2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

Topping:

2 ounces good quality dark chocolate, coarsely chopped
2 ounces good quality white chocolate, coarsely chopped
Decorations: crushed candy cane, chopped toasted almonds, coarse sugar, sprinkles

Preheat oven to 350° F. Line rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cookies: Place almonds in food processor and process into a fine crumb. In a medium bowl, stir together processed almonds with flour. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter, sugar, and vanilla, beating at medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2-3 minutes. Add flour mixture to mixer in three batches, mixing on low speed until just combined.

To form cookies, scoop off about a tablespoon of dough then roll between hands to shape into a log about 3 inches long. Place on baking sheet, then pull ends down and pinch to form a crescent shape, leaving about 1 inch between each cookie. When sheet is full, gently press down each cookie to flatten slightly. Bake until golden on bottom, about 13-15 minutes. Allow to cool slightly on baking sheet then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.

Topping: Whisk dark chocolate in a glass bowl set over a small pot of simmering water until mostly melted, then remove from heat and whisk until smooth. Once cookies have cooled, dip one end of each into chocolate then sprinkle with desired decoration. Place on wax paper to dry. Repeat process with white chocolate.

 
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Recipe adapted from Very Merry Cookie Party.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Sarah Bernhardt Cookies

For this month’s recipe, we’re taking a trip through Paris with our new exhibition, Posters of Paris: Toulouse-Lautrec and His Contemporaries. Alphonse Mucha created this poster for Sarah Bernhardt, one of the most renowned actresses of the 19th century. She was so loved, in fact, that a Scandinavian baker named a cookie for her. Though somewhat complex, these multilayered confections are sure to dazzle, much like their namesake and her posters.

Alphonse Mucha, Gismonda, 1894-1895, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Kurt J. Wagner, M.D., and C. Kathleen Wagner Collection, M.87.294.1

Sarah Bernhardt Cookies

Yields about 60 cookies
Level: Advanced

Filling:

6 ounces good quality dark chocolate, coarsely chopped
Scant ½ cup sugar
Scant ½ cup water
3 large egg yolks, room temperature
¼ cup heavy cream, room temperature
½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Cookies:

3 cups blanched slivered almonds
1 ½ cups sugar
3 large egg whites, room temperature
1 ½ teaspoons almond extract
Splash of water

Coating:

12 ounces good quality dark chocolate, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons vegetable shortening

Filling: Whisk chocolate in a glass bowl set over a small pot of simmering water until smooth and melted. Remove chocolate from heat and set aside to cool. Combine sugar and water in small saucepan and simmer until syrup becomes clear, about 5 minutes, then set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer set over a small pot of simmering water, whisk egg yolks until warm, about 2 minutes.

Transfer bowl to stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment. Add cream and beat mixture on medium until combined. Reduce speed and slowly pour in hot syrup. Return speed to medium and continue beating until cool and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add melted chocolate, scraping down sides of bowl as needed until fully incorporated. Refrigerate filling until firm, about 1 hour (or up to 1 week).

Cookies: Preheat oven to 325° F. Line rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Place almonds in food processor and process for 1 minute. Add sugar and process into a fine crumb, about 3 minutes. Add egg whites and almond extract and process until mixture wads around blade. Scrape bowl with spatula and add splash of water. Process a few more seconds until paste is firm yet smooth enough to pipe.

Transfer paste to pastry bag fitted with coupler only (no tip). Pipe small rounds onto prepared baking sheet, applying pressure to bag for about 4 seconds per cookie and leaving 1 inch between each. Bake until golden around the edges, about 20 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through. Allow to cool slightly on baking sheet then transfer to metal rack to cool completely.

Once cookies are completely cool, transfer filling to pastry bag fitted with coupler only or with #11 tip. Pipe a peaked mound of filling on top of each cookie. Transfer cookies to freezer until filling is very firm, about 1 hour.

Coating: Whisk chocolate in a glass bowl set over a small pot of simmering water until smooth and melted. Remove from heat and stir in shortening. Cool until barely warm.

Remove cookies from freezer and place on cooling rack. Working quickly so filling doesn’t melt, spoon melted chocolate over cookies until filling is completely covered. Refrigerate finished cookies and serve chilled.

 

Sarah with a finished Sarah, dusted in gold like her beautiful posters.

Almond macaroon recipe adapted from Baking Illustrated and used with Sarah Bernhardt cookie recipe, adapted from Martha Stewart’s Cookies.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives


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