Archive for November, 2013

Friday Photos: DMA Thanksgiving Potluck

On Monday, DMA staff broke bread together for a Thanksgiving potluck. Check out all the amazing treats and eats we enjoyed!

We hope you and yours enjoyed a delicious Thanksgiving holiday too!

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Give Thanks

At this time of year, many people begin to take stock of moments and experiences they are thankful for. The act of sharing this gratitude with others, and reviewing those things that may have been taken for granted, can actually increase an individual’s well-being. According to Cicero, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of the virtues but the parent of all others.” In an effort to spread this sense of well-being to our Canvas blog readers, I asked my colleagues in the Education Division to share a work of art from the DMA’s permanent collection or special  exhibitions that they are thankful for—whether it is a work they enjoy visiting in a  moment of free time; or perhaps one they regularly use in a program; or even a work of art they would like to learn more about. Enjoy their responses below and of course, feel free to share your own! 🙂

  • HalberdierAmanda Batson – C3 Program Coordinator. I am thankful for The Halberdier by Ferdinand Hodler, located in our European collection. This massive work of art confronts you as you exit the blue elevators in an inescapable way. At first glance, the soldier seems fierce and almost living up to his reputation as the ultimate protector of Switzerland. I am incredibly thankful for this work of art by Hodler because no matter how fierce or stoic it may seem—it has a bit of whimsy. If you look closely you will notice that the mustache of the Swiss soldier goes up towards his cheek on one side and down towards his chin on the other. I am not sure what the intention of the artist was but I cannot help but laugh about this every time I see it! Some days you just really need a laugh! 
  • Amelia Diary of FlowersAmelia Wood – McDermott Intern for Family and Access Teaching. When Jim Hodges: Give More Than YouTake opened in October, I immediately felt a connection with the artwork.I was especially struck by Diary of Flowers (When We Met). My interest in diaries was sparked when I saw Day After Day: The Diaristic Impulse at the University Art Museum in Albany, NY, last spring.Artists involved in this show were focused on recording their daily lives, including personal rituals, narratives, and experiences. I’ve never been great at keeping a diary, and I was moved by the way in which the process of keeping a diary forces you to slow down and appreciate day-to-day life. Hodges Diary of Flowers has evoked a similar response in me, and I’ve enjoyed revisiting the artwork when I need a reminder to slow down and, well, smell the flowers.
  • sculpture gardenRhiannon Martin – Volunteer Coordinator. am thankful for the sculpture garden as a whole, because it is a nice place to escape from the busy work day for a bit and enjoy the weather when it’s nice out. The sculptures throughout the lawn are a beautiful backdrop and help to create a wonderful space to sit and relax. 
  • Amy teaching in front of Family Portrait 1963

    Amy Elms – McDermott Intern for Visitor Engagement. I’m thankful for Family Portrait 1963 because it helped me to become oriented with the DMA’s weekend Studio Creations when my internship first began. Martin Delabano’s sculpture is filled with so much hidden meaning and is also made from a variety of found objects. While helping with Studio Creations in September, I really enjoyed learning about ways that visitors of all ages can become engaged with a work of art.

  • leahMatisseLeah Hanson – Manager of Early Learning I’m grateful for Henri Matisse’s Ivy in Flower primarily because it just makes me happy. I like the bold, clean shapes, the colors, and the order of it. Matisse was a favorite of mine in the art history classes I took, and I wrote a paper about his cut paper collages in particular. I liked that he found a way to create even at a time when it could have been easy to give up or lose hope. When I finally got to see this in person, I was so amazed at how large it is…you can never tell that in a reproduction or a print. I loved when it was hanging in the Concourse just outside C3 because I saw it every day.
  • JC Bigornia – C3 Program Coordinator. I’m impacted to this day by the 2007 special exhibition Phil Collins: The World Won’t Listen. It’s one of my top five all-time favorite DMA exhibitions, and I can still ???????????????????????????????feel the energy and sheer joy of being in that space. It’s hard to describe the appeal of watching people sing karaoke, and I certainly hadn’t listened to much of The Smiths before that show. I think what resonated for me was the absolute love and passion that each person brought to their performance; you could totally empathize with that person’s sense of happiness, loss, etc. I used to spend part of every day in that exhibition because no matter how down I felt, I always came out of there feeling charged up…there’s really no other word to describe it except infectious. I was always thankful to have that kind of place to escape to and I think the lessons I took away from each of the participant’s performances—bravery, honesty, compassion—will always stay with me.
  • hi-cJessica Fuentes – C3 Gallery Coordinator. I’m thankful for HI-C Avenger by John Hernandez.  I love that this piece is so bright and energetic. It catches the attention of visitors of all ages, and as it is currently installed at the entrance of the Center for Creative Connections, an interactive educational space for all ages, it is a perfect fit! I also love telling visitors that this is a piece by a Texas based artist who used to live in Oak Cliff and graduated from UNT. Having work by local artists can be so inspiring to young artists.
  • hayley2Hayley Prihoda – McDermott Intern for Gallery and Community Teaching. Picturing that Day stood out to me on my first tour of the Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take exhibition and, after innumerable visits, has remained one of my favorite works in the show. Having performed in choir in high school, the imagery of the sheet music immediately reminded me of my adolescence. Upon closer examination, I was excited to discover that the piece also features two of my favorite songs – “Landslide” and “Climb Every Mountain”. My mom is a beautiful singer and my sister and I grew up listening to Fleetwood Mac and watching the Sound of Music. Now that I am 1000 miles away from my family, I am very grateful to have this connection to home on view at the DMA.
  • Amanda Blake – Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences. I am thankful for Isaac Soyer’s Art Beauty Shoppe in the American galleries. In graduate school I focused on American art from the 1920s and 1930s and wrote my thesis on two artists from the Fourteenth Street School. Every time I see this painting it is like visiting a familiar friend and traveling back in time to 14th street in New York City! I love teaching with this artwork because of its narrative aspects and sensory possibilities. I think this painting is a great one to use to teach about the social and cultural changes taking place in the early twentieth century and I enjoy using it with all ages.

Works of art shown:

  • Ferdinand Hodler, The Halberdier, 1895, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, Mrs. John B. O’Hara Fund and gift of Nona and Richard Barrett
  • Jim Hodges, Diary of Flowers (When We Met), 1994, Barbara and Michael Gamson
  • Ellsworth Kelly, Untitled, 1982-1983, Dallas Museum of Art, commission made possible through funds donated by Michael J. Collins and matching grants from The 500, Inc., and the 1982 Tiffany & Company benefit opening
  • Martin Delabano, Family Portrait 1963, 2001, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Bryant M. Hanley, Jr., Lorine and David H. Gibson, and Sonny Burt and Bob Butler
  • Henri Matisse, Ivy in Flower, 1953, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation
  • Phil Collins, dunia tak akan mendengar, 2007
  • John Hernandez, HI-C Avenger, 1992, acrylic on wood, Dallas Museum of Art, Texas Artists Fund
  • Jim Hodges, Picturing That Day, 2002, The Art Institute of Chicago
  • Isaac Soyer, Art Beauty Shoppe, 1934, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Public Works of Art Project

I’d like to say how thankful I am to all of you who shared some of your favorite works of art!

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist

Run the DMA Marathon

It’s that time of year again, and the excitement of the Dallas PCS Marathon has arrived! Last year, the marathon races drew over 15,700 runners and 300,000 spectators. It’s expected to be bigger than ever this year, and the city of Dallas is pulling out all the stops. The Dallas Museum of Art is joining the city in welcoming runners and their friends, families, and fans alike!

As both a McDermott intern in the education department and a runner, I had the pleasure (and pain!) of gaining my Museum feet during the height of my training for the marathon. As I learned to navigate through the galleries, I discovered that the DMA has many things in common with a marathon: it’s huge, it’s inspirational, and there are lots of friendly staff members to support you along your journey. Therefore, I am thrilled to combine two of my passions–running and museums–in inviting you to embark on your very own DMA Marathon. I’ve highlighted some of my favorite artworks throughout the DMA’s galleries, hand-picked to motivate, inspire, and refuel you. So, what are you waiting for? Lace up your running shoes, and get ready to explore!

Registration: DMA Atrium
The DMA has free general admission (every day!), so you don’t need to pull out your wallet for this race. But please do hit up the Visitor Services Desk to sign up for the DMA Friends program. With your shiny new DMA Friends membership, you’ll be able to check in at various locations in the Museum and earn points toward exciting DMA rewards such as free parking, sneak peeks at new exhibitions, and exclusive Museum experiences. The Atrium is also a great place to grab a pre-race bite in the DMA Cafe, use the line-free bathrooms, and get in your stretches in front of Robert Rauschenberg’s breathtaking Skyway or Rufino Tamayo’s iconic painting El Hombre (Man).

Robert Rauschenberg, Skyway, 1964, oil and silkscreen on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Roberta Coke Camp Fund, The 500, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Mark Shepherd, Jr. and General Acquisitions Fund

Robert Rauschenberg, Skyway, 1964, oil and silkscreen on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Roberta Coke Camp Fund, The 500, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Mark Shepherd, Jr. and General Acquisitions Fund, (c) Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Rufino Tamayo, El Hombre (Man), 1953, vinyl with pigment on panel, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association commission, Neiman-Marcus Company Exposition Funds

Rufino Tamayo, El Hombre (Man), 1953, vinyl with pigment on panel, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association commission, Neiman-Marcus Company Exposition Funds, (c) Estate of the artist in support of Fundacion Olga y Rufino Tamayo, A.C.

Resist Temptation and Find Your Pace: Level 4: Ancient American Art and American Art
The starting gun goes off and you head up the stairs to Level 4, where you will come face to face with Tlaloc, the DMA’s rain god. But no need to worry about rain inside the Museum, Tlaloc was also a war god and will send you off with blessings of stamina and power!

Head of the rain god Tlaloc, Mixtec, Late Postclassic period, c. 1300-1500, ceramic, tufa, stucco, and paint, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Marcus in memory of Mary Freiberg

Head of the rain god Tlaloc, Mixtec, Late Postclassic period, c. 1300-1500, ceramic, tufa, stucco, and paint, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Marcus in memory of Mary Freiberg

As you make your way by Crawford Riddle’s bedstead, deemed “The Big Bed” by our younger visitors, try not to be distracted with thoughts of putting your feet up so early in the race. You’ve worked hard to prepare for this moment, and this bed should serve as a reminder that some well-deserved relaxation awaits you at the end of this journey!

Crawford Riddell, Bed, c. 1844, Brazilian rosewood, tulip poplar, and yellow pine, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of three anonymous donors, Friends of the Decorative Arts Fund, General Acquisitions Fund, Discretionary Decorative Arts Fund, and the Boshell Family Foundation

Bedstead, Crawford Riddell, c. 1844, Brazilian rosewood, tulip poplar, and yellow pine, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of three anonymous donors, Friends of the Decorative Arts Fund, General Acquisitions Fund, Discretionary Decorative Arts Fund, and the Boshell Family Foundation

Also, I know how easy it is to let the excitement of the race throw off your timing. Gerald Murphy’s Watch is a great reminder to check your pace and adjust your gallery viewing speed if necessary.

Gerald Murphy, Watch, 1925, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the artist

Gerald Murphy, Watch, 1925, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the artist, (c) Estate of Honoria Murphy Donnelly

Dodge Obstacles and Find Inspiration: Level 3: Arts of Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection
Head down the stairs to Level 3, where you will come face to face with sculptures, jewelry, and artifacts from Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. You may want to pick up the pace when you spot the coffin of Horankh in the Ancient Egyptian gallery. We have several Egyptian coffins (including one with an actual mummy inside!), and although they are beautiful, they are rumored to look a little too alive at times!

Coffin of Horankh, Late Period, c. 700 B.C., Thebes, Egypt, wood, gesso, paint, obsidian, calcite, and bronze, Dallas Museum of Art, the Cecil and Ida Green Acquisition Fund

Coffin of Horankh, Egypt, Thebes, Late Period, c. 700 B.C., wood, gesso, paint, obsidian, calcite, and bronze, Dallas Museum of Art, the Cecil and Ida Green Acquisition Fund

Before you leave the third floor, loop around to the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection for some inspiration. Vincent van Gogh’s Sheaves of Wheat is a breathtaking sight that should not be missed!

Vincent van Gogh, Sheaves of Wheat, July 1890, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

Vincent van Gogh, Sheaves of Wheat, July 1890, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

Beat “The Wall”: Level 2: Ancient Mediterranean and European Art
Trot down the stairs to Level 2, where you will glide between athletic bodies featured in the Greek and Roman statues, busts, and antiquities. Pat yourself on the back; after this race, you will be able to rank yourself among these talented athletes!
At this point in the race, it is common to hit “the wall,” and you may be starting to feel like the characters in Fernand Leger’s Divers or Picasso’s Guitarist in the European galleries, but keep going–you’re almost to the end!

Fernand Léger, The Divers (Red and Black), 1942, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the James H. and Lillian Clark Foundation

Fernand Léger, The Divers (Red and Black), 1942, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the James H. and Lillian Clark Foundation, (c) Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Pablo Picasso, The Guitarist, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Art Museum League Fund

Pablo Picasso, The Guitarist, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Art Museum League Fund, (c) Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The Light at the End of the Tunnel: Level 1: Contemporary Art
Your heart is pounding as you head into the final stretch of the marathon. Your final leg will take you back up the Museum Concourse to the finish line in the contemporary art galleries. You can hardly believe your eyes when you catch a glimpse of Mark Rothko’s Orange, Red and Red and wonder if you are seeing a mirage. But it is real, and the finish line is surrounded by gorgeous contemporary works. Take in the sights as you relish this moment–you did it!

Mark Rothko, Orange, Red and Red, 1962, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated

Mark Rothko, Orange, Red and Red, 1962, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, (c) 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

It’s been my pleasure to take you along on the DMA Marathon. We hope that you are able to join us during marathon weekend and experience the Museum firsthand! Best of luck to all of my fellow runners; see you at the finish line!

Amelia Wood is the McDermott intern for family & access teaching at the DMA.

Culinary Canvas: Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

In the spirit of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, DMA staff came together yesterday to celebrate with a potluck and pie competition–which of course, yours truly had to enter. And wouldn’t you know, we have the perfect print to match: Thanksgiving. Is this what your kitchen will look like come Thursday? While it was only me in the kitchen baking pie this weekend, it sure felt this chaotic! Although I can’t say my pie was an official DMA winner, the presentation certainly did have that wow factor. And the rich chocolate flavor is bound to knock your socks off. Happy Thanksgiving!

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942,Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection, bequest of Juanita K. Bromberg

Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

Yields a 9 inch pie
Level: Moderate

Crust:

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 ½ tablespoons shortening
Scant ¼ cup cold water

Stir together salt and flour. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture forms into small crumbs. Sprinkle in just enough water to bring dough together into a ball. Flatten ball into a disk and chill in refrigerator until ready to roll out. Dough can also be made ahead and frozen until ready to use, thawing beforehand in the refrigerator.

Filling:

1 ½ cups sugar
cup flour
cup unsweetened cocoa
¾ cup butter, melted
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
3 eggs, room temperature
1 cup toasted pecans, chopped
1 pie crust

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spread pecans evenly onto sheet and toast in oven about 5-6 minutes, until nuts turn slightly darker and become fragrant. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Chop one cup and set aside the remaining halves.

Lightly flour a tea towel spread across a baking sheet. Roll out crust on floured surface to about 2 inches beyond the circumference of the pie dish. Place pie dish upside down on top of crust and, using the baking sheet as support, gently flip crust over on top of dish. Situate crust into dish, gently pressing any cracks back together.

In medium bowl, whisk together sugar, flour, and cocoa. Mix in melted butter, corn syrup, and vanilla. Add eggs one at time, mixing until fully incorporated. Stir in chopped pecans with rubber spatula. Pour filling into prepared pie dish.

Bake pie about 35 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer to metal rack to cool completely. Filling will look rather loose but will set as it cools.

Topping:

1 cup sugar
¼ cup water
½ cup heavy cream, room temperature
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
½  teaspoon sea salt
2 cups toasted pecan halves

In medium heavy bottom saucepan, stir together sugar and water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Boil for about 8 minutes, swirling pan occasionally until sugar begins to change to a dark amber color. Watch very closely to ensure sugar does not burn. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in cream and butter. Stir constantly until bubbling stops and butter is fully incorporated. Whisk in sea salt. Set aside to cool slightly.

Once pie has cooled, arrange remaining pecan halves on top, beginning with the outer rim and working inward. Pour warm caramel topping over pecans, covering entire pie in an even layer. Lightly sprinkle with fancy sea salt flakes if desired.

 
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Crust recipe courtesy my mom. Pie recipe adapted from Southern Living.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Steamboat Mayflower

While New England can claim the original Mayflower, the South has the Steamboat Mayflower! The DMA’s collection includes this 1855 color lithograph by Nathaniel Currier of the high-pressure steamboat Mayflower.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, and safe travels whether by plane, car, or steamboat!

Nathaniel Currier, after Charles Parsons, High Pressure Steamboat Mayflower, 1855, color lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, Junior League Print Fund

Nathaniel Currier, after Charles Parsons, High Pressure Steamboat Mayflower, 1855, color lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, Junior League Print Fund

Stacey Lizotte is the head of adult programming and multimedia services at the DMA.

Art is a Form of Truth

We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda; it is a form of truth. … In free society art is not a weapon and it does not belong to the spheres of polemic and ideology. Artists are not engineers of the soul. It may be different elsewhere. But democratic society – in it, the highest duty of the writer, the composer, the artist is to remain true to himself and to let the chips fall where they may. In serving his vision of the truth, the artist best serves his nation. And the nation which disdains the mission of art invites the fate of Robert Frost’s hired man, the fate of having “nothing to look backward to with pride, and nothing to look forward to with hope.”
– President John F. Kennedy, Amherst College, October 26, 1963

Robert Rauschenberg, Skyway, 1964, oil and silkscreen on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Roberta Coke Camp Fund, The 500, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Mark Shepherd, Jr., and General Acquisitions Fund, © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Robert Rauschenberg, Skyway, 1964, oil and silkscreen on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Roberta Coke Camp Fund, The 500, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Mark Shepherd, Jr., and General Acquisitions Fund, © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Friday Photos: Engaging the Community

Since beginning my McDermott Internship, I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to explore ways that visitors can develop engaging, memorable experiences here at the DMA. One unique aspect of my internship has been the opportunity not only to work with those already in the Museum, but also to share information about DMA educational resources with the Dallas community.

Maria Teresa Garcia-Pedroche, Head of Community Engagement, devotes her time to forming deep connections with community organizations and I’ve been privileged to join her as she worked with two of these groups: AVANCE and Trinity Links.

AVANCE is a nonprofit organization that provides family support and educational services to at-risk families. In October, Maria and I visited some of the organization’s adult learning classes to share information about C3, First Tuesdays, Studio Creations, DMA Friends, and Late Nights. Many in the class were unaware of these free programs and were excited to take their families to the Museum.

Maria Teresa discusses DMA Friends with AVANCE members.

Maria Teresa discusses DMA Friends with AVANCE members.

AVANCE members learn about free DMA programs.

AVANCE members learn about DMA programs.

Trinity Links is a female service organization whose members currently work with the SoSMAART Girls, a group of girls dedicated to learning more about science, math, the arts, aviation, reading and technology. Trinity Links recently brought the SoSMAART Girls to the DMA for personalized tours and studio workshops. Many of the girls were first time visitors to the DMA and enjoyed learning more about Jim Hodges and about traditional methods of dying fabric.

Trinity Links members arrive at the DMA with the SoSMAART Girls.

Trinity Links members arrive at the DMA with the SoSMAART Girls.

SoSMAART Girls tour C3.

SoSMAART Girls tour C3.

SoSMAART Girls and their families dye their own fabric after visiting Saturated.

SoSMAART Girls and their families dye their own fabric after visiting Saturated.

I’m excited to connect with more Dallas organizations in the coming months as I continue working with Maria Teresa. How do you connect with organizations in your community?

Amy Elms
McDermott Intern for Visitor Engagement


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