Archive for October, 2015

Friday Photos: Great Pumpkin Contest 2.0

Education staff celebrated Halloween with some festive pumpkin decorating fun this afternoon. For our second annual Great Pumpkin Contest, we had a spirited pumpkin patch full of artistic gourds sure to knock the socks off of Linus himself.

But there can be only one winner, and this year that honor went to Jessica Fuentes and Jessica Thompson, for their detailed interpretation of The Minotaur. Snoopy was so proud.

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Sarah Coffey
Education Coordinator

Haunting Opera

We were digging through the archives and found the photo below. The back states “‘The Sacrifice’ DMFA comic opera 1962 (Aug).” We don’t know the full history of this photo but we thought it was a fitting image for Halloween. We hope your holiday is perhaps less eventful than this trio’s in the 1960s.

“The Sacrifice” DMFA comic opera 1962 (Aug) L to R: Gene Mitchell, John Lunsford, Jerry Jane Smith

“The Sacrifice” DMFA comic opera 1962 (Aug); left to right: Gene Mitchell, John Lunsford, Jerry Jane Smith

 

 

Red Hot

This past weekend the annual TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art benefit dinner and contemporary art auction raised a record $8.3 million! In commemoration of the event, which supports the DMA’s contemporary art acquisitions fund and amfAR’s AIDS research efforts, and in recognition of Ellsworth Kelly, this year’s honored artist, we installed the artist’s work Red Panel, which entered the DMA’s collection in 1985. You can view this work in the Museum’s Concourse on your next visit, and then stop by Untitled , which was commissioned for the Museum’s Sculpture Garden.

Friday Photos: Pop Icon Collages

C3 coordinator Jessica Thompson helped us channel our inner Pop artist during last Friday’s Late Night Studio Creations workshop, where visitors used laundry bags, cardboard, magazine clippings, and handkerchiefs to create collages of their favorite Dallas icons. By the end of the night, the studio’s back wall had transformed into a fantastic community installation that gave International Pop a run for its money.

It isn’t easy to pick a favorite, but I’d have to go with the collage of Big Tex during his final moments in 2012. What are your favorite Dallas icons?

Paulina Lopez
McDermott Graduate Intern for Visitor Engagement

The Wise Llama…part 2

The Wise Llama is one of my favorite posts that I have done for Uncrated. So, when I found more photos of the handsome Sir Lancelot while I was processing the John and Nora Wise Papers in the DMA Archives, I knew I had to share.

John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

Here is Sir Lancelot, a pure white llama, promoting John Wise’s exhibition World of Ancient Gold at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. Nora Wise is behind Sir Lancelot, holding his reins.

The following two photos show Sir Lancelot enjoying treats and showing off his John Wise Ltd. accessory while posing for photos during his day at the Fair.

Fair Pictures International Corp. #190-2 John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

Fair Pictures International Corp. #190-2
John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

Fair Pictures International Corp. #190-4 John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

Fair Pictures International Corp. #190-4
John and Nora Wise Papers, DMA Archives

Sir Lancelot is by far the cutest llama in the archives . . . OK he is the only one, but he’s still adorable.

Hillary Bober is the Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Hop on Pop!

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All kinds of good things are POPping up here at the DMA with the opening of the new exhibition International Pop. The Barrel Vault is filled with bright colors, oversized paintings, familiar faces, and works of art that will make you smile. Why not hop on Pop at home too? I’ve rounded up some of my favorite children’s books to introduce our youngest visitors to the art and artists who POP!

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Toddlers

Two beautiful and fun concept books perfect for the toddler crew are Pop Warhol’s Top by Julie Appel and Amy Guglielmo and Counting with Wayne Thiebaud by Susan Goldman Rubin. Pop Warhol’s Top mixes together the best of touch & feel books with works by famous Pop artists. Tots can pretend to pull the lettuce off a Claes Oldenburg soft sculpture, touch the eyelashes on one of Andy Warhol’s famous Marilyn Monroe pieces, or tap the beat for an exuberant Keith Haring painting. Rubin’s Counting with Wayne Thiebaud will have little ones asking for “more, please!” as they use Thibeaud’s luscious dessert paintings to count from one to ten.

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Preschool

Pre-readers will POP till they drop as they work their way through the alphabet in Rachel Isadora’s ABC POP! Isadora takes inspiration from Pop artists to depict everyday objects in a Pop art sensibility. A is for airplane and Z is for zoom, and everything in between is illustrated with comic strip word bubbles, close-ups, boldly drawn lines, and lots of dots. Uncle Andy’s Cats by James Warhola introduces emerging readers to Andy Warhol through the eyes of his nephew James and tells the true story of the 20+ kittens Warhol had running through his New York townhouse, all with the name of Sam! Children will love trying to find all the kittens on each page, and also see glimpses of some of Warhol’s most famous works tucked away in the illustrations.

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Elementary

Susan Goldman Rubin highlights some of the most famous American Pop artists–Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and Wayne Thiebaud–in three beautifully illustrated biographies for young readers. Wham!: The Art & Life of Roy Lichtenstein introduces readers to Roy as a boy who loved to draw and invent machines who grew up to be an artist that found inspiration in comic books. Andy Warhol: Pop Art Painter traces Andy’s journey from a commercial artist to a world-wide sensation who made his name by painting one of his favorite meals as a child–soup! Delicious: The Art & Life of Wayne Thiebaud weaves together the artist’s memories from childhood and mouth-watering reproductions of Thiebaud’s dessert paintings to create a balanced view of the artist’s varied career. All three volumes give readers a peek “behind the canvas” to gain a better understanding of these men as real people.

After you’ve made your way through these POPular books, we hope you’ll POP in and see the International Pop exhibit for yourself!

Leah Hanson
Manager of Early Learning Programs

Late Night Knock Out

Ushio Shinohara

This past Friday, artist Ushio Shinohara entered the artistic ring to create one of his Boxing Paintings out on the Museum’s Ross Avenue Plaza as part of our Late Night celebrating the opening of International Pop. Late Night visitors were able to experience his interactive painting style in which he uses paint-soaked sponges attached to boxing gloves to create his unique brand of action painting. If you missed Friday’s artist performance, you still have a chance to view four works by Shinohara in the International Pop exhibition on view through January 17, 2016.

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Kimberly Daniell is the Manager of Communications and Public Affairs at the DMA.

Friday Photos: Fair Day!

On October 7, the DMA Education Division took a small (and well-deserved!) break to explore the food, photography and fun at the State Fair of Texas! We really enjoyed the Creative Arts Exhibition Hall, and of course the crazy fried food concoctions. In honor of the Fair’s closing weekend, here are a few snaps from our day!

Madeleine Fitzgerald
Audience Relations Coordinator

Lessons Learned from a Kid Whisperer

Last summer, resident kid whisperer, Leah Hanson, asked me to step in to teach one of her Toddler Art classes. I had observed Leah’s Early Learning programs in the past and thought it would be a cinch. After all, Leah made it look easy!

Her classes were like the scene of Edward Hicks’ The Peacable Kingdom. Teaching her class would be a breeze! Right?

Edward Hicks, The Peaceable Kingdom, c. 1846-1847, Dallas Museum of Art, The Art Museum League Fund

…WRONG!

There was nothing “peaceable” about the scene that ensued. In fact, it much more closely resembled Michelangelo’s Torment of Saint Anthony, on view at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth.

Deeply humbled by the experience, I returned to Leah’s classes to watch with a much more observant eye. While she made the classes look easy, Leah was carefully employing mindful techniques to help her class go smoothly.

Here’s what I learned:

Don’t just give the rules, explain them

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Any child who has ever taken a class with Leah is ready to tell you, “We have oils in our skin that are good for us, but bad for the art. That’s why we don’t touch the art!” Give the agency of rules to the child by asking them to help you be the protector of the art.

 

 

 

Keep your cool

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With a group of excited children, it can be tempting to raise your voice level to be heard over them. This is a downward spiral. As you get louder, the kids will also get louder and pretty soon you will be at a full cacophony. Instead, lower your voice until you’re in a whisper. The kiddos will quiet down to hear your “secret” information.

 

 

Speak their language

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Think back. Way back. Remember when your teacher would tell you to fold your paper “hotdog style” or sit “crisscross applesauce” and you knew exactly what she meant? Especially with toddlers, it’s important to know that you are being understood, not just heard. Don’t know kid lingo? Befriend an elementary school teacher to teach you the ropes!

 
Ask about it

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Instead of trying to interpret a child’s artwork on your own (and risk misinterpreting it!), ask them to tell you about their work of art. You will be amazed by what you find out!

 

 

 

 

Play isn’t a bad word

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Museums are often thought of as solemn places, where education takes precedent over entertainment. But at the DMA, we believe that play is important too! Cognitive research has revealed that play is the central device for exploring and learning, developing new skills, and making connections with others. Playing thoughtfully with children will also help nurture their natural curiosity and creativity. 

Be specific in your praise

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Instead of saying, “That’s a great painting” try to take a closer look at the child’s artwork and find a specific quality to praise, such as “I love how you combined straight lines and zig zag lines in your painting”. This will encourage you to look more closely at the artwork and the child will appreciate your attentive eye.

 

 

I returned to the Early Learning programs with these tips and tricks and was amazed at how well the next class went. Practice Leah’s approach and you, too, will be kid whispering in no time!

Emily Wiskera
McDermott Intern for Family and Access Teaching

Texas-Sized Tea with Friends

In September, a group of DMA Friends joined us for an exclusive and new DMA Friends rewards event: Tea Time, Deep in the Heart of Texas. We began our afternoon getting to know each other over Texas-inspired light refreshments which included sweet tea and lemonade paired with mini jalapeño cornbread muffins and mini buttermilk biscuits, baked fresh especially for us by the wonderful staff of the DMA Cafe.

Dallas Museum of Art_DMA Friends Tea Time, Deep in the Heart of Texas (9)_September 2015_Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

We learned interesting tidbits about each other, such as what artwork from the DMA collection Friends wanted to take home.  The Icebergs was the clear winner,  yet another Friend wanted to jump into The Ocean’s Bounty: Undersea Windows by Louis Comfort Tiffany!

Next, we ventured up to the Dozier study room, a meeting space named after and honoring Texas artists Velma and Otis Dozier. Rae Pleasant, the Museum’s  Research Associate for Early Texas Art, showed us objects in the collection that we might not ordinarily see as they are displayed in cases inside the DMA offices.

The “Tea Time, Deep in the Heart of Texas” reward gives DMA Friends a fun social interaction combined with a new way to engage with art. We heard interesting facts, perused archival material and shared personal reactions to the artworks in Dozier as well as in the Museum galleries. Best of all, we deepened and expanded our circle of art Friends!

Start saving your points now and be on the look out for a new tea time with a new theme at the beginning of the new year.

Tanya Miller is the Friends Community Manager at the DMA


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