Archive for November, 2013



Come to the DMA and Play!

The C3 adults are at it again and this time they didn’t spare one ounce of fun! C3 offers a variety of programming for adults on Thursdays, when our visitors have the opportunity to have hands-on experiences with art and artists, be social, and experiment with materials. Think Creatively, one of our popular programs, allows visitors to dig deeper into certain aspects of creative thinking.

Think Creatively on November 7 was designed around the theme of play and how it helps adults enhance their thinking and learning. Dr. Magdalena Grohman and I decided to ask our participants to step out of their comfort zone and participate in a TASK party. TASK parties, originally designed by artist Oliver Herring, are improvised events with loose structure and minimal rules.
 


 
We set up the C3 Studio in a way that would promote playful experimentation, fun, and artful self expression. Varieties of materials were placed on worktables around the studio: paper, boxes, tape, sticks, and even toilet paper! The rules were simple: take a TASK from the TASK pool in the center of the room and do what it says. Then when a TASK is completed, write a new TASK and put it into the pool and get another one. Simple as that!

There were a set amount of tasks already created with an intent to promote play and participation from the same perspective as Mildred Parten. Parten studied social play in children and suggested that there are six types of play:

  • Unoccupied play: the child is relatively stationary and appears to be performing random movements with no apparent purpose. A relatively infrequent style of play.
  • Solitary play: the child is completely engrossed in playing and does not seem to notice other children. Most often seen in children between 2 and 3 years-old.
  • Onlooker play: the child takes an interest in other children’s play but does not join in. May ask questions or just talk to other children, but the main activity is simply to watch.
  • Parallel play: the child mimics other children’s play but doesn’t actively engage with them. For example, they may use the same toy.
  • Associative play: children are now more interested in each other rather than the toys they are using. This is the first category that involves strong social interaction between children while they play.
  • Cooperative play: some organization enters children’s play, for example the playing has some goal and children often adopt roles and act as a group.

We knew that anything could happen—and it sure did!

Task Pool

Task Pool

Task: Build a fort for a cat

Task: Build a fort for a cat

Task: Tell someone in the museum a secret

Task: Tell someone in the museum a secret

Working away!

Working away!

Visitors at play

Visitors at play

Task: Draw a portrait

Task: Draw a portrait

Task: Create a Mask

Task: Create a Mask

Don’t miss our next Think Creatively workshop on December 5, 2013. If you are reading this post and are interested in attending for 50% off–click here and enter the special code: CANVAS.

Amanda Batson
C3 Program Coordinator

Creating the DMA Conservation Studio

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In the summer of 2012, the Dallas Museum of Art began making plans to renovate the former Seventeen Seventeen Restaurant space and transform it into a new Paintings Conservation Studio as part of the Museum’s initiative to establish a more comprehensive in-house conservation program. Construction began in the fall of 2012, and the studio is now complete, as is the adjacent Conservation Gallery. This time-lapse film captures the building process, as seen from the vantage point of what is now a public gallery space.

The Paintings Conservation Studio features state-of-the-art technology—including a digital X-ray system—and will serve as a center for the study and treatment of works of art, as well as research into cutting-edge conservation methodologies. Brightened with natural light from new skylights and enclosed by glass walls, the studio’s design will allow visitors to observe daily activity, providing audiences with a singular behind-the-scenes experience. Activities in the studio also will be visible from both the Conservation Gallery and the adjacent outdoor Rose Family Sculpture Terrace.

The first exhibition in the gallery, Behind the Scenes, highlights the artists’ original materials and techniques, as well as the conservation histories of the works on display, exploring the various treatments they have undergone. This adjoining gallery will regularly rotate works, providing a space to explore the conservation process in greater detail through visual representations.

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Mark Leonard is the chief conservator at the DMA.

Rooms Within Rooms – Stephen Lapthisophon

Stephen Lapthisophon shared with “Uncrated” what he hoped visitors would see and take from his exhibition Concentrations 56: Stephen Lapthisophon—coffee, seasonal fruit, root vegetables, and “Selected Poems,” currently on view at the DMA.
Stephen_Lapthisophon_Studio_2013_066 - Copy

This is an exhibition that can be approached in many ways. It is an exhibition about how we approach the art. How our bodies move through space, and the things, materials, and stuff we carry around with us. It is a show about closeness and distance. The exhibition is divided into two distinct but related rooms. And rooms and walls within rooms. And boxes and drawers and suitcases within the rooms and underneath the drawers. The layers of accumulated dirt, marks, stains, scrapes, and scratches are an invitation to stay. I hope the works ask you to ask questions.

Pencils, ink, cardboard, olive oil, and rust. Bacon fat, spray paint, sheetrock, nails, bricks, rosemary, and books. String, coffee, eggshells, dirt, wax, saffron, and more dirt. A desk, a ladder, and books. This exhibition exists in tribute. Reading, thinking, and acting through and with things. “Denken ist Danken.”

Before the opening, Lapthisophon sat down with us to discuss his art and process. Find out more in the video below:

What did you feel and think after visiting “Concentrations 56: Stephen Lapthisophon”?

Stephen Lapthisophon is an artist and educator.

Friday Photos: Art of the Smoothie

Working at the DMA, we are constantly surrounded by amazing artists and beautiful works of art. Passing through the galleries on a regular basis, it is no wonder that some of us have become very taken by the art objects we see, slowly integrating them into our daily lives.

These days, many DMA educators have jumped on the green smoothie bandwagon! Walking by so many tasty-looking paintings filled with fruits and veggies (especially around lunchtime) has been a quirky inspiration to many of us in our quest for health and the perfect green smoothie. There is a kale-idoscope of smoothie-worthy produce to see in the DMA galleries!

Our collection has many still life paintings that were originally very popular with collectors in Europe and the United States because they nicely complemented the grand interiors of luxurious homes newly built on the east coast. These paintings showcase the same delicious fruits and veggies that many of us use in our breakfast or lunchtime smoothies. Check out some of the inspirations for our blended green concoctions and then visit the collection to see how many fresh garden goods you can find to add to your green smoothie grocery list!

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Make your own sweet pear smoothie inspired by Allport’s Still Life with Fruit:

Ingredients (serves 2)

2 cups spinach, fresh
2 cups almond milk, unsweetened
4 pears
1 banana
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Blend spinach and almond milk until smooth. Next add the remaining fruits and blend again. Top with cinnamon.

Check out Simple Green Smoothies for more artful smoothies!

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist

I Thank My Lucky Stars

As a child, I never attended sleepaway camp. My idea of summer camp was largely shaped by a few books I had read and (to be honest) the movie Dirty Dancing. So when a dear friend told me she had registered for an art camp exclusively for women, I was immediately intrigued. Once I looked at the Lucky Star Art Camp website, it didn’t take long for me to follow suit. The camp promised five days of creative workshops, nightly guest speakers, and a gaggle of like-minded women, all during the best weather of the year in the most beautiful area of Texas (in my opinion).

Camp Waldemar

Camp Waldemar

Lucky Star offered a wide array of workshops you might expect at an art camp: painting, creative writing, photography, and jewelry-making. It also offered sessions on cheese-making, canning and preserving, and yoga. My personal background is in art history rather than studio art, but I do love to make things and would practice yoga every day if I could. This led me to sign up for activities that I would do more often if I had the time: a sewing class, a jewelry class, an art and yoga class, and a creativity free-for-all workshop.

In the days (and hours) leading up to camp, I will admit I had a few doubts. It’s funny, even as an adult I’m pretty sure I experienced some of the same fears and concerns I would have felt as a child: Will our cabins and beds be clean and comfortable? Will I be eating “camp” food, like hot dogs, all week long? And, perhaps most scary, will I like my classes and make friends with the other campers, roughly seventy-five in all?

Pretty much all of my concerns were dispelled within the first few hours of arrival. I can emphatically and ecstatically say that Lucky Star far exceeded ALL of my expectations. First question: Will our cabins and beds be clean and comfortable? Here are a few views of the gorgeous Camp Waldemar, which hosted Lucky Star.

Cabin exterior

Cabin exterior

Cabin interior

Cabin interior

The Guadalupe River runs through Camp Waldemar.

The Guadalupe River runs through Camp Waldemar

Beautiful cypress trees along the river

Beautiful cypress trees along the river

Second question: Will I like the food? As it turned out, every single meal was delicious, healthy, and made with fresh ingredients. Among the highlights were bright and crunchy salads every day for lunch, a sweet treat at every meal, and the warm hospitality of Chef Laura and her staff.

Third–and biggest–question: Will I like my classes and make friends with the other campers? The answer? YES! I loved all of my instructors–four talented, creative, funny, and generous women. I learned something new in each class and walked away feeling happy, renewed, and inspired. Each class offered just enough structure and instruction blended with freedom to take our projects in the direction of our choice. I also enjoyed chatting with and getting to know my fellow campers, who were all wonderfully different, creative, and talented in their own ways. During mealtimes, we would sit and chat excitedly about the class we had just taken. We could also view and display projects from different classes, which inspired a lot of “Ooh, I want to take that class next year!”

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Each evening after dinner, a different speaker shared with us her personal and professional passions and creative ideas. Bernadette Noll, author of Slow Family Living and co-creator of the Slow Family Movement, shared wise words related to the time that we give to our family and to ourselves to be creative. We were privileged to get a sneak preview of Lisa Seeger’s TED talk (fast forward to the three hour, fourteen minute mark) about Blue Heron Farm, the goat dairy she runs with her husband, and their strong beliefs about the food we eat and how it is grown and raised. And Shawn Strattman shared her inspiring story of achieving her creative dream, and gave us practical, tangible advice for pursuing our own creative dreams.

But that’s not all! After dinner, after our evening speakers, and after the stars came out, we gathered around the campfire for the lovely musical stylings of Austin-based guitarist and songwriter Mandy Rowden. Mandy charmed us all with her wit and musical talent, and was generously kind and supportive during our sing-alongs.

Campfire music with Mandy

Campfire music with Mandy

At the end of camp, I felt blissfully happy, relaxed, and refreshed. Working at the DMA,  I am surrounded by art and creative people. People sometimes assume that I am also an artist, or at least a creative person. While working in a museum environment can definitely be inspiring, it can also be intimidating. I learned many things during my time at Lucky Star, but I walked away with two simple, yet important lessons that I can apply both in my professional and personal life:

  • Make time for yourself to be creative. It doesn’t have to be a huge chunk of time, working on a big project with lots of materials. It can be as simple as doodling on a postcard-sized piece of cardboard, writing a message on the other side, and sending it to a friend. Or, you can keep a journal of daily musings, drawings, mixed-media collages – whatever you want. You can even set a timer for five minutes if you want to keep your creative time short and focused.
  • Give yourself a break. I hit a creative wall during a class, and my instructor suggested I take a walk. I strolled by the river, relaxed on a hammock, and explored the campgrounds. Much to my delight, I discovered a cabin called “Happy Haven.” When I returned to class, I felt like a weight had been lifted, and I channeled my Happy Haven feeling into my artwork.

I’ve surrounded myself with little reminders of my classes and my new friends, such as the collage I hung in my office and the wrap bracelets I made during and after camp that I now wear daily. A few weeks ago, Mandy happened to come through town and I was thrilled to introduce her to friends during a fun potluck dinner and house concert. My friends and colleagues are probably tired of hearing my many art camp stories, but I cannot emphasize enough the incredible and, yes, life-changing experience I had during those five days in Texas Hill Country at Lucky Star Art Camp.

Melissa Gonzales
C3 Gallery Manager

What Hopper Saw

The opening of the much-anticipated exhibition Hopper Drawing: A Painter’s Process is just around the corner. Organized by Curator of Drawings Carter E. Foster of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the show had a very successful run there before coming to Dallas. Shortly before the show’s opening here, we were fortunate to sit down with Carter for a quick Q&A to learn a bit more about the exhibition.

Edward Hopper, Self-Portrait, 1945, fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.287, © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y.

Edward Hopper, Self-Portrait, 1945, fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.287, © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y.

In what regard did Hopper hold his drawings? Simply as a means to an end? Or more?
Hopper actually tended to belittle his drawings when asked about them. During his lifetime, he somewhat reluctantly shared them with others when they inquired about his drawings. He most definitely considered himself first and foremost a painter, and his drawings were the means through which he worked out his ideas for paintings. But he also seems to have done them for his own private satisfaction, as many artists do, as a way to keep his hand and eye honed.

 Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939, fabricated chalk on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art. Image courtesy of gwen-photoblog.blogspot.com

Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939, fabricated chalk on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art. Image courtesy of gwen-photoblog.blogspot.com

 

Do you have a favorite drawing,or suite of drawings that have a particular appeal? And, why?
There are many, but I especially love the close-up bust-length study for New York Movie, in which Hopper features just the slightest winsome half-smile on the face of the usherette (in this case, his wife, Jo, who posed for him). The technique of this drawing is just amazing, with a variety of textures and great subtlety in the play of light across her face.

Did you have any preconceived notions that were overturned by what you learned during your research?
No. When I do research I try to let the material lead the way. Research is about asking the right questions, rather than having pre-formed ideas.

How did you discover some of New York’s buildings in Hopper’s drawings?
Mainly by looking at the incredible collection of photographs from the 1930s commissioned by the Local History division of the New York Public Library. They are all online and searchable by street location. Very useful! Also, the collection of “Subway construction photographs” at the New York Historical Society was an important source of images of a vanished New York City.

How did your idea for this exhibition develop?
Since I’m curator of drawings, and half of our drawing collection is works by Edward Hopper, it made perfect sense to propose an exhibition. I was lucky to be able to delve in so deeply.

Edward Hopper, Study for Nighthawks, 1942, fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift of Josephine N. Hopper by exchange 2011.65, © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y.

Edward Hopper, Study for Nighthawks, 1942, fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift of Josephine N. Hopper by exchange 2011.65, © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y.

What new discoveries about Hopper’s drawing process did you make in the course of working on this exhibition?
The heart of this exhibition is examining what Hopper saw, what he drew, and what he painted in order to understand better his artistic process. I think the research, in particular on Nighthawks and New York Movie, helped us elucidate more clearly than ever before the way Hopper tweaked and tinkered with reality to get to his uncanny, often strange, and ultimately universal imagery of the human condition and the self in the world.

Martha MacLeod is the curatorial administrative assistant for the European and American Art Department at the DMA.

Work Pals with Wendell

When we were assigned work pals, Amy and I were both intrigued and excited about being matched up with Wendell Sneed. Although we had seen him around the Museum, we didn’t know a lot about him or the work he did at the DMA. Following the meeting, several coworkers also shared their excitement about our partnership with Wendell- sending links that revealed his role in the Dallas jazz and funk scene in the 1960’s and 70s. Although black musicians in Dallas at that time struggled with segregation, Wendell, a drummer, and Roger Boykin, a guitarist, organized the first and only South Dallas Pop Festival and founded Soultex Records.

Wendell with Soul Seven, who performed at the South Dallas Pop Festival.

Wendell with Soul Seven, who performed at the South Dallas Pop Festival.

Today, Wendell, who has worked at the DMA for over twenty years, is the Program Coordinator for Jazz in the Atrium, a free event every Thursday night during which visitors enjoy food, drinks, and live jazz performances. Before we became work pals, we were unfamiliar with the process of how Jazz in the Atrium is organized, but after getting to know Wendell a bit more and enjoying our own night of jazz, we were able to better understand all the hard work that goes into organizing such a lively Museum event.

Jazz in the Atrium brings in large crowds to the Museum every Thursday and as Wendell explained to us, many families and couples have been attending for years. He also revealed that prospective artists often approach him at the event about their interest in performing. Wendell welcomes this interest and invites artists to send him a press pack and a demo. He then does research to find out if the artist is performing in the Dallas area. If they are, he makes an effort to listen to them live. He sometimes he doesn’t let the artists know that he is planning on attending and stands somewhere in the venue where they can’t see him. This helps Wendell to get a good feel for the artists’ ‘true sound.’

Wendell’s favorite part of organizing Jazz in the Atrium is when his chosen artists finally perform. The night that we attended, we had the privilege of listening to jazz artist Breggett Rideau. A 2009 Grammy Nominee for Best Jazz Vocal Album, Breggett is a New Orleans native who now resides in the Dallas area and performs at the DMA multiple times a year.

Wendell welcomes jazz lovers and introduces Breggett Rideau.

Wendell welcomes jazz lovers and introduces Breggett Rideau.

Breggett Rideau impresses the crowd last Thursday night.

Breggett Rideau impresses the crowd last Thursday night.

Throughout the past two months, we have truly enjoyed the time we’ve spent with Wendell. His passion for music is contagious and he enjoys sharing it with everyone he meets. We look forward to learning more from him during the rest of our internship at the DMA and encourage everyone to check out a night of Jazz in the Atrium this holiday season!

Amy and Amelia

Amelia Wood
McDermott Intern for Family and Access Teaching

Amy Elms
McDermott Intern for Visitor Engagement

Lend Your Strength

Howard Chandler Christy, Fight or Buy Bonds. Third Liberty Loan,  United States Department of the Treasury, Forbes Lithographic Manufacturing Company, 1917, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Howard Chandler Christy, Fight or Buy Bonds. Third Liberty Loan, United States Department of the Treasury, Forbes Lithographic Manufacturing Company, 1917, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

In honor of Veterans Day, we pulled together a few of the War Bond posters from The Great War in the DMA’s collection. Thank you to all who have protected and served this country and to those who continue to do so.

Gil Spear, Lend Your Strength to the Red Triangle. Help the "Y" help the fighters fight. United War Work Campaign, November 11 to 18, United War Work Campaign, 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Gil Spear, Lend Your Strength to the Red Triangle. Help the “Y” Help the Fighters Fight. United War Work Campaign, November 11 to 18, United War Work Campaign, 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Sidney H. Riesenberg, Over the Top for You. Buy U. S. Gov't Bonds, Third Liberty Loan, United States Department of the Treasury, Ketterlinus, 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Sidney H. Riesenberg, Over the Top for You. Buy U. S. Gov’t Bonds, Third Liberty Loan, United States Department of the Treasury, Ketterlinus, 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Sidney H. Riesenberg, The Jewish Welfare Board United War Work Campaign—Week of November 11, 1918, United War Work Campaign, Alco-Gravure, Inc., 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Sidney H. Riesenberg, The Jewish Welfare Board United War Work Campaign—Week of November 11, 1918, United War Work Campaign, Alco-Gravure, Inc., 1918, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Unknown, Your War Savings Pledge. Our Boys make good their pledge. Are you keeping yours?, United States Department of the Treasury, Government Printing Office, 1917, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Unknown, Your War Savings Pledge. Our Boys Make Good Their Pledge. Are You Keeping Yours?, United States Department of the Treasury, Government Printing Office, 1917, color offset lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Marcia M. Middleton in memory of Joel Middleton

Sleeping with Art: Not in the Biblical Sense

A year ago, before the launch of DMA Friends, we were brainstorming unique and fun rewards to offer. One idea we all jumped on was to hold a DMA Overnight at the Museum. We decided that this would be the “big reward” for DMA Friends to redeem, worth 100,000 points!

Ten months later, ten DMA Friends had earned enough points to redeem the reward. So on Friday, November 1, we hosted our first DMA Overnight!

The Overnight Crew!

The Overnight Crew!

We started planning for the DMA Overnight late this summer, and the question that we kept asking ourselves was “what are we going to do with our guests this evening?” Could they roam free for hours on end, should we pack the evening with activities, would they even want to sleep at some point or test their endurance by staying awake the entire night?

After researching other museums’ overnight programs, which were mostly nature and science museums, we put together a schedule that included an hour of free time, a curator-led tour, three different gallery activities, a midnight snack, an optional early sleep time, watching a film or playing games, and finally a time for “lights out,” when everyone had to be in their sleeping bags for the night (which ended up being close to 4 a.m.).

Knowing this group had done a lot at the DMA (they did earn 100,000 points after all!), we wanted them to have a new experience in the galleries, so we created a game for the DMA Overnight called Roll with It! This competitive dice game took the guests throughout the Museum as they searched for a work of art that matched the roll of the dice. One die gave a gallery location, one gave a feature that the work needed to include (red, 3D, animals), and one gave an action for the guests to do (pose, sketch, make a sound) in response to their chosen work of art. The team that completed the most rolls in 30 minutes won the game.

DMA Overnight by the numbers:

1,000,000 – points earned by 10 DMA Friends to attend the Overnight

23 – Friends

108 – glow sticks worn

3 – hand-made dice

10 – “art babies” created during the Creativity Challenge

1 – ghost story

5 – Friends who got up early to do yoga in the galleries

4 – average number of hours Friends slept during the DMA Overnight

Lights Out at the DMA

We were also excited to have Luke Darby from the Dallas Observer join us for the DMA Overnight. You can read about his experience here.

Stacey Lizotte is head of adult programming and multimedia services at the DMA, and designated RA of DMA Overnight.

Accessible Teamwork

We love collaboration here at the DMA, and when it comes to teamwork, Texas Women’s University occupational therapy students are fantastic additions to our team! Since 2009, the DMA has held quarterly-occurring Autism Awareness Family Celebrations for children with autism and their families to enjoy activities in the Museum before it opens to the public. For the past two years, we have been lucky to partner with TWU’s occupational therapy students led by Dr. Tina Fletcher, OTR, EdD, MFA. The students host the TWU Sensory Room during every Autism Awareness Family Celebration and they transform our Tech Lab into a quiet space filled with weighted vests, therapy balls, tunnels, and resources for families.

Dr. Fletcher is an invaluable partner to the Museum’s Access Programs as she attends the Meaningful Moments program as well as every Autism Awareness Family Celebration and advises us on best practices. Dr. Fletcher is unique in that in addition to being a professor of occupational therapy, she is also an Autism Specialist as well as an artist – she brings many perspectives to our Access Programming! This year three of Dr. Fletcher’s students are working with us on research and evaluation related to our Autism Awareness Family Celebrations – their projects involve creating and testing social stories, creating and testing gallery guides written specifically for children with sensory issues, and researching the way that parents think about the Museum.

TWU Occupational Therapy student Ana Antonetti volunteering at our recent Autism Awareness Family Celebration

TWU Occupational Therapy student Ana Antonetti volunteering at our recent Autism Awareness Family Celebration

One of Dr. Fletcher’s students, Ana Antonetti, is conducting research about parents’ perceptions of the DMA. Ana has been a part of recent Autism Awareness Family Celebrations and we are excited to learn about her research results. We would love to have your assistance in helping us to improve on our programming for children with autism! Please see details below from Ana about how you can help:

The Dallas Museum of Art is collaborating with Texas Woman’s University to conduct a study comparing the perceptions of parents of children with and without autism spectrum disorders about participation in museum activities.

The information gathered will be used to help the DMA with program development and accessibility.

To be able to participate in this study you must be a parent of a child that has participated in activities at the DMA in the past OR a parent who is interested in having their child participate in Museum activities. Your child must be age 18 or younger.

Please follow this link to complete the questionnaire: https://www.psychdata.com/s.asp?SID=156983

Thank you!

Amanda Blake
Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences


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