Posts Tagged 'Thanksgiving'

Home Is Where the Art Is

“Now this is the good stuff,” notes Leon Pollard, an artist from the Stewpot Art Program, as he settles in front of Jean Baptiste Marie Pierre’s The Abduction of Europa. We’re exploring flowers in the DMA’s collection, and Leon, who was recently commissioned to paint a mural for his church, immediately points out how Pierre skillfully guides the viewer’s eye across the expanse of the oversized 18th-century canvas. He breaks into a characteristic grin and says, “I really look forward to coming every month. It’s always an education—an inspiration.”

Leon sharing his work in the Sculpture Garden

This summer we marked the one-year anniversary of our monthly gallery teaching program in partnership with The Stewpot, a community outreach program that serves homeless and at-risk populations here in Dallas. Beyond addressing basic survival needs, The Stewpot offers enrichment opportunities for healing, financial support, and personal growth. The Stewpot Art Program offers class time and art supplies to individuals looking to express themselves creatively, grow as artists, and support themselves through the sale of their work. Thanks to Tanya Krueger, one of our DMA docents who also volunteers for The Stewpot, we were able to connect and coordinate a monthly visit for Stewpot artists here at the DMA. Visit by visit, we’ve gotten to know each other and the artists have grown more comfortable in the Museum. A favorite memory of mine is when one of the artists, Donald of Dallas, dropped by to visit during a rainy day, knowing he was welcome at the DMA.

Working with the Stewpot Art Program has been an eye-opening introduction to the realities of homelessness in our community. Our diverse group includes former teachers, first responders, and veterans. Importantly, there is no single narrative of homelessness, and we should never assume that homelessness reflects the consequence of an individual’s poor decisions. Over the past year, I’ve gained a deeper appreciation for the importance of building relationships and inviting our community into the Museum. This point was driven home when Leon observed, “I used to sleep in the Arts District because it’s peaceful and you can sometimes hear music. I never knew this was here! Now I learn something new every visit by looking at the art.”

Luis with David Alfaro Siqueiros’s Self-Portrait (The Great Colonel) in the México 1900–1950 exhibition earlier this year

Words cannot express how grateful and thankful I am to work with this group and get to know the artists. Together, we’ve seen art come alive through our participants’ experience and interpretations. We’ve shared moments of joy and gratitude—such as when one of the artists, Luis, broke into applause in front of David Alfaro Siqueiros’s Self-Portrait (The Great Colonel), which was on view in the special exhibition México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde—and we’ve encouraged each other to take risks and try new styles and subject matter when we sketch in the galleries. We’ve celebrated graduations, new jobs, and a participant receiving a new set of dentures. We have even taken solace in the timeless beauty of the Keir Collection following the unexpected loss of a participant. Our experience illustrates that art is for everyone, and that studying art helps us understand the human experience and enriches our lives. Looking back, especially during the Thanksgiving season, on our time together sharing gallery discussions, art making, and an appreciation for art and each other’s company, I am deeply thankful for the opportunity to work with the amazing Stewpot artists.

Lindsay O’Connor is the Manager of Docent and Teacher Programs at the DMA.

A Thanksgiving Trifecta

It is well known in my family that the only foods I need on my plate for Thanksgiving dinner are turkey, corn, and mashed potatoes. No other food needs to pass my way at the table.

In honor of my favorite holiday meal, I share with you images of turkeys and corn from our collection. And while we don’t have any works of art featuring mashed potatoes, Matthew Barney’s The Cloud Club does feature whole potatoes…and a piano.

Helen Altman, Turkey, 1995, scorch on paper, Dallas Museum of Art, The Texas Artists Fund and gift of Karol Howard and George Morton, © Helen Altman, 1997.152.4

Helen Altman, Turkey, 1995, scorch on paper, Dallas Museum of Art, The Texas Artists Fund and gift of Karol Howard and George Morton, © Helen Altman, 1997.152.4

Otis Dozier, Wild Turkey, 1987, lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.63

Otis Dozier, Wild Turkey, 1987, lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.63

Untitled (mola: turkey with two monkeys), Latin America, 20th Century, cotton, applique, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, DS.1990.300

Untitled (mola: turkey with two monkeys), Latin America, 20th Century, cotton, applique, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, DS.1990.300

Otis Dozier, Indian Corn, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.47

Otis Dozier, Indian Corn, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.47

Otis Dozier, Maize and Windmill, 1937, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, The Barrett Collection, Dallas, Texas, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 2007.15.20

Otis Dozier, Maize and Windmill, 1937, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, The Barrett Collection, Dallas, Texas, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 2007.15.20

Otis Dozier, Maize and Farmhouse, 1939, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.40

Otis Dozier, Maize and Farmhouse, 1939, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Dozier Foundation, ©Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1990.40

Corn Cob Effigy, Pre-Columbian, 900-1500 A.D.?, ceramic, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. Nancy G. Sayles, 1987.377

Corn Cob Effigy, Pre-Columbian, 900-1500 A.D.?, ceramic, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. Nancy G. Sayles, 1987.377

Matthew Barney, The Cloud Club, 2002, mixed media, Dallas Museum of Art, Contemporary Art Fund: Gift of Arlene and John Dayton, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon E. Faulconer, Mr. and Mrs. Bryant M. Hanley, Jr., Marguerite and Robert K. Hoffman, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, Deedie and Rusty Rose, Gayle and Paul Stoffel, and three anonymous donors; DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund; and Roberta Coke Camp Fund, © 2002 Matthew Barney, courtesy Barbara Gladstone, 2003.24.1.A-D

Matthew Barney, The Cloud Club, 2002, mixed media, Dallas Museum of Art, Contemporary Art Fund: Gift of Arlene and John Dayton, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon E. Faulconer, Mr. and Mrs. Bryant M. Hanley, Jr., Marguerite and Robert K. Hoffman, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, Deedie and Rusty Rose, Gayle and Paul Stoffel, and three anonymous donors; DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund; and Roberta Coke Camp Fund, © 2002 Matthew Barney, courtesy Barbara Gladstone, 2003.24.1.A-D

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Stacey Lizotte is Head of Adult Programming and Multimedia Services

Thanksgiving Still-Lifes

Inspired by the DMA’s newest exhibition, Bouquets: French Still-Life Painting from Chardin to Matisse, I thought it would only be appropriate for my first Canvas blog post to incorporate still-lifes from our collection. So with Thanksgiving just behind us, I wanted to share some my favorite food-related still-lifes in our collection.

This 17th century still-life makes even the most wonderful Thanksgiving leftovers seem bland. Anyone care for some lobster?

Abraham Hendricksz Van Beyeren, Still Life with Landscape, 1650s, Dallas Museum of Art, The Karl and Esther Hoblitzelle Collection, gift of the Hoblitzelle Foundation

Abraham Hendricksz Van Beyeren, Still Life with Landscape, 1650s, Dallas Museum of Art, The Karl and Esther Hoblitzelle Collection, gift of the Hoblitzelle Foundation

After all of the yummy turkey, stuffing, casseroles and potatoes , how about some fruit (and maybe champagne) to lighten your leftover hangover?

Severin Roesen, Fruit Still Life with Champagne, 1848, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Pauline Allen Gill Foundation

Severin Roesen, Fruit Still Life with Champagne, 1848, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Pauline Allen Gill Foundation

The Friday after Thanksgiving is a wonderful holiday all on its own. I like to stay in, enjoy my friends’ and families’ company, relax and read the paper, and eat some yummy leftovers (maybe even a turnip or two!). It is the best part of the holiday weekend!

William Michael Harnett, Munich Still Life, 1882, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

William Michael Harnett, Munich Still Life, 1882, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

I hope you enjoyed the Thanksgiving holiday! And if you didn’t finish your Christmas shopping last weekend or you’re looking for a cyber Monday fix, don’t forget to check the Museum Store’s website to find many unique presents and local crafts!

Happy Holidays!

Madeleine Fitzgerald
Audience Relations Coordinator for Programming

Thankful for the DMA

Any other year at this time, I would be heading home to enjoy Thanksgiving with my family in Maine. This year, however, marks my first Thanksgiving away from home – the journey from Texas to New England is a bit too far to make for the holiday! I recently moved to Dallas to take part in the DMA’s McDermott Internship Program, which runs from September to May. Being away from my family is difficult this year, but I am grateful for all of the experiences that have been offered to me as the McDermott Graduate Intern for Gallery and Community Teaching.

While my intern duties cover a wide variety of roles here at the Museum, one of my main focuses is Go van Gogh, our community outreach program that brings a piece of the DMA to local elementary and middle schools. This past week, I spent time at Martha Turner Reilly Elementary School with a class of 4th graders. Our program was called Art of the Lone Star State, and it offered the students (and myself) the chance to learn more about the history of this state through art. We looked at works of art that depict Texas landscapes and cityscapes before making our own landscapes with watercolor pencils.

The opportunity to work with children is one of the reasons I applied for this internship, so I am extremely happy that I get to work with our Go van Gogh program.

All of the amazing Go van Gogh programs would not be possible without our volunteers! Go van Gogh has over 30 volunteers, both in Dallas and the surrounding Metroplex. These individuals volunteer their time with the programs in schools, but also spend time here at the DMA for volunteer training. During training, the volunteers become the students as we simulate the programs that they teach. We also spend time in the galleries, looking at the works of art that the students will see. Being a Go van Gogh volunteer shows a commitment to the DMA and to education, and we are extremely grateful to have such wonderful volunteers!

Go van Gogh is just one of the many programs I have been involved with during my time at the Museum. Three months into my nine month internship, I have worked closely with the docents, given school tours, and been involved in programs with Booker T. Washington High School, just to name a few! While I miss my family, I am thankful that I have this position and I can’t wait to see what the rest of the internship brings! And of course, I’m thankful for the opportunity to drive our amazing van around town!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Liz Bola
McDermott Graduate Intern for Gallery and Community Teaching

Friday Photos: DMA Thanksgiving Potluck

On Monday, DMA staff broke bread together for a Thanksgiving potluck. Check out all the amazing treats and eats we enjoyed!

We hope you and yours enjoyed a delicious Thanksgiving holiday too!

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Culinary Canvas: Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

In the spirit of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, DMA staff came together yesterday to celebrate with a potluck and pie competition–which of course, yours truly had to enter. And wouldn’t you know, we have the perfect print to match: Thanksgiving. Is this what your kitchen will look like come Thursday? While it was only me in the kitchen baking pie this weekend, it sure felt this chaotic! Although I can’t say my pie was an official DMA winner, the presentation certainly did have that wow factor. And the rich chocolate flavor is bound to knock your socks off. Happy Thanksgiving!

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection

Doris Lee, Thanksgiving, 1942,Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts, The Alfred and Juanita Bromberg Collection, bequest of Juanita K. Bromberg

Salted Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie

Yields a 9 inch pie
Level: Moderate

Crust:

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 ½ tablespoons shortening
Scant ¼ cup cold water

Stir together salt and flour. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture forms into small crumbs. Sprinkle in just enough water to bring dough together into a ball. Flatten ball into a disk and chill in refrigerator until ready to roll out. Dough can also be made ahead and frozen until ready to use, thawing beforehand in the refrigerator.

Filling:

1 ½ cups sugar
cup flour
cup unsweetened cocoa
¾ cup butter, melted
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
3 eggs, room temperature
1 cup toasted pecans, chopped
1 pie crust

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spread pecans evenly onto sheet and toast in oven about 5-6 minutes, until nuts turn slightly darker and become fragrant. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Chop one cup and set aside the remaining halves.

Lightly flour a tea towel spread across a baking sheet. Roll out crust on floured surface to about 2 inches beyond the circumference of the pie dish. Place pie dish upside down on top of crust and, using the baking sheet as support, gently flip crust over on top of dish. Situate crust into dish, gently pressing any cracks back together.

In medium bowl, whisk together sugar, flour, and cocoa. Mix in melted butter, corn syrup, and vanilla. Add eggs one at time, mixing until fully incorporated. Stir in chopped pecans with rubber spatula. Pour filling into prepared pie dish.

Bake pie about 35 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer to metal rack to cool completely. Filling will look rather loose but will set as it cools.

Topping:

1 cup sugar
¼ cup water
½ cup heavy cream, room temperature
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
½  teaspoon sea salt
2 cups toasted pecan halves

In medium heavy bottom saucepan, stir together sugar and water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Boil for about 8 minutes, swirling pan occasionally until sugar begins to change to a dark amber color. Watch very closely to ensure sugar does not burn. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in cream and butter. Stir constantly until bubbling stops and butter is fully incorporated. Whisk in sea salt. Set aside to cool slightly.

Once pie has cooled, arrange remaining pecan halves on top, beginning with the outer rim and working inward. Pour warm caramel topping over pecans, covering entire pie in an even layer. Lightly sprinkle with fancy sea salt flakes if desired.

 
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Crust recipe courtesy my mom. Pie recipe adapted from Southern Living.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Steamboat Mayflower

While New England can claim the original Mayflower, the South has the Steamboat Mayflower! The DMA’s collection includes this 1855 color lithograph by Nathaniel Currier of the high-pressure steamboat Mayflower.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, and safe travels whether by plane, car, or steamboat!

Nathaniel Currier, after Charles Parsons, High Pressure Steamboat Mayflower, 1855, color lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, Junior League Print Fund

Nathaniel Currier, after Charles Parsons, High Pressure Steamboat Mayflower, 1855, color lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, Junior League Print Fund

Stacey Lizotte is the head of adult programming and multimedia services at the DMA.


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,486 other followers

Twitter Updates

Flickr Photo Stream

Categories