Posts Tagged 'instagram'

Farewell to #LauraOwens

We’ve reached the final weekend of our Laura Owens exhibition, and the whimsy and wonder that lit up our Hoffman Galleries will be fondly missed after its closing day on Sunday, July 29. This exhibition has been inspiring to many, and we can see why; the intricate artworks that represent the artist’s career from the mid-1990s to today include intriguing themes of fantasy, pop culture, nature, technology, and the avant-garde that tie it all together. Exploring Owens’s art was the highlight of many fun spring and summer programs and classes at the DMA, including Arturo’s Art & Me, Family Workshops, and Teen Tours. We also saw incredible new works of art created by visitors to the exhibition, including this vivid poem written by a young poet in The Writer’s Garret‘s summer program “Rail Writers.”

Among the inspiring aspects of this presentation is how delightfully “Instagram-able” it is, allowing viewers to create their own stories around each playful artwork and connect with an even broader audience. Just search the hashtag #LauraOwens and you’ll find a lively array of visitors interacting with Owens’s bold works and becoming part of the art. With bright colors, thickly layered swashes of paint and other mixed media, and untitled works that leave many subjects up to the imagination, these works are all about stimulating and sharing curiosity. Here’s a look back at what a few of our visitors had to say about their experiences:

_.mickelodeon._“Laura Owens is an amazing artist; prior to my venture I hadn’t heard of her. But now, I am a fan.” –@_.mickelodeon._

“Went to see some art without realizing we are the art.” –@ary_balderrama

in_dfwfamily2“Her work is LOUD, quirky, silly, dimensional, full of layers!” –@in_dfwfamily

edithvm“Exhibición de Laura Owens está llena de color y amor” –@edithvm

IMG_E1065“This painting really cat-ures my spirit.” –@kmeansbusinezz

There is still time left for you to share your perspective from this exhibition, whether it’s on social media or through artistic creations of your own. Either way, there is plenty to take away from Owens’s art, and we hope you take the opportunity this weekend to discover what that inspiration looks like for you.

Hayley Caldwell is the Communications and Marketing Coordinator at the DMA.

Foxes and Fireflies: An Interview with Mel Remmers

When we found local artist Mel Remmers’s Instagram account, we were drawn to her distinct artistic style. With her wide-eyed, emotionally captivating portraiture, witty captions, and some sneak peek shots sprinkled into the mix, she reveals her work and process to her growing following in an engaging and down-to-earth way. Because we noticed elements of fashion, whimsicality, nature, and experimentation with textures and colors in her work, we were eager to invite her to a viewing of our Laura Owens exhibition. Inspired by Owens’s works, the paintings Remmers created welcome you into a fantasy world of their own.

 

Photo Credit: Stevie Hudspeth

Check out our interview with Remmers about her process:

Tell us about yourself as an artist.
In February 2015, I bought a child’s paint set from a grocery store. Seeking to find a creative therapy after battling cancer and needing emotional repair, I posted my first attempt at painting on Instagram and I was shocked and excited by such a positive response. I was hooked! This started Instagram becoming part of the creative process. As my following grew fast, I sold my first painting after four weeks, and as of November 2017 my 400th sold.

My paintings started out as fashion-inspired female figures, and in time I added motion to them. Now I paint portraiture that provokes a mood with either dark shadows or the expressions in the eyes. I am also fascinated by light and have focused periods with black-and-white paintings as well as ink. The majority of my paintings consist of multiple mediums and tools such as gold foil and others as I have discovered them. Hand-painted wallpaper with a nature-inspired theme has become my most requested commission and my new obsession.

What was your first impression of the Laura Owens exhibition?
As I walked into the exhibit, my eyes drew on the immense scale, the bold and playful works. Then as I moved closer I was lost in the details of unexpected elements, heavily sculpted paint textures, and her no-fear use of PINK.

What did you find most inspiring about this exhibition?
Most notably, the grand scale of her work. I have a strong desire to “Go Big”—paint on walls or just use a larger canvas than usual. This connection brought that buzz to continue on that path.

Another inspiring spark was the variance of her work. The abstract collages flowing to whimsical childlike characters of animals was a delightful scene.

I was also thrilled to see her unexpected three-dimensional elements and use of materials like felt, and her beehive painting where it looked like bees were buzzing above the canvas.

What was the painting process for your pieces like?
As I walked away from the exhibit, reflecting and imagining this collaboration, I knew to go with my gut response. Fireflies were my first whisper, and I wanted to play off the forest scene where you find animals peeping throughout the painting.

Since I usually do not plan or sketch, I started with the trees and then water emerged. All of this is evolving while I am filming to Instagram, and my specific music choices have come to set the mood of where I am in the process.

RemmersDMACollection Reflections-1

I am a fast painter so I wanted to be patient and take my time. That equaled four days of nine hours at a time, and that also included a second painting that I felt told more of the story. The water, with its intense color and light reflection of the first painting, became the continuation of the story in the second painting and introduced a new character, the glitter fox.

These paintings are made with acrylics, some oils, chalk, pastel, and ink, and the fireflies are made of tiny crystals and glitter glue.

MelRemmers ForestFinal 1

Remmers GlitterFox1

What elements or themes from Laura Owens’s work did you incorporate into your pieces?
My collaborative theme became nature. I wanted to bring a sense of belonging. I usually focus on a feminine theme, and now she became a living part of it. Her dress inspiration was taken from a large impasto glob from one of Laura’s abstracts that I found crazy good. So her dress looks like a dripping, thick waterfall floating into the water.

Do you have any other takeaways from this experience?
My takeaway is LIMITLESS. In a world where the trending word is “brand,” Laura Owens does not have a limit to her visions or exclusivity. She goes from sky high drawings of cats to a wild abstract collage. Laura’s work has calmed my doubts of risk taking, opened a larger vision, and given my creations a wider world to live in and explore. And, glitter glue IS a medium.

Hayley Caldwell is the Communications and Marketing Coordinator at the DMA.

Friday Photos: #DMAfaves

This summer, we have a new self-guided tour available at our visitor services desks and online: #DMAfaves. It includes twelve of our favorite artworks from across the globe and throughout human history, so the tour will take you all over the Museum! Read each artwork’s label to learn more about it, then earn DMA Friends points and a special badge by checking in at each work along the way.

In addition to these, we wanted to share a few more of our own favorites from the collection:

And now we want to know your faves! Be sure to stop by, check out the #DMAfaves guide, then share a photo of you with your own fave DMA artwork on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter with #DMAfaves–and don’t forget to tag us!

See you soon!

Artworks Shown:

  • John White Alexander, Miss Dorothy Quincy Roosevelt (later Mrs. Langdon Geer), 1901-1902, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Pauline Allen Gill Foundation in memory of Pauline Gill Sullivan
  • Donald Judd, Chair, executed 1998, designed 1984, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Robert Dean Brownlee
  • Gerald Murphey, Watch, 1925, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the artist, © Estate of Honoria Murphy Donnelly
  • John Singer Sargent, Dorothy, 1900, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Leland Fikes Foundation, Inc.
  • Hakuin Ekaku, Daruma, n.d., Dallas Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund
  • Frederic Edwin Church, The Icebergs, 1861, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Norma and Lamar Hunt

Sarah Coffey
Education Coordinator

A Very Big Outdoor Art Show

This week Art Everywhere US launched onto billboards, bus stops, digital screens, and more across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Keep your eyes peeled while road tripping and commuting for some of your DMA favorites, including The Icebergs and The Peaceable Kingdom, when you are out on the town. Check out some photos from across the country below and share your finds on Instagram with #ArtEverywhereUS. If you are ready for an art hunt, discover the locations on the Art Everywhere US interactive map.

Art, Camera, Selfie!

We love seeing the creative photos that our visitors take with our collection, so we’re turning the spotlight on you. This summer, feel free to explore, and share your fun with us!

Now through Labor Day, visitors who submit their creative DMA photos will receive a chance to win a private tour of the DMA with curator Olivier Meslay, and everyone who participates receives a free ticket to Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne.

Enter your own DMA snapshot here and enjoy some of the great photos that we’ve already received – even Chef Stephan Pyles got in on the action!

 


Anthea Halsey is the Senior Marketing & Social Media Manager at the DMA

Friday Photos: Picture Yourself at the DMA

Spring Break week has been a blast, but the fun isn’t over yet!  The DMA will be open until 9:00pm tonight, Friday March 14, for the Dallas Arts District Spring Break Block Party. Come by to experience our fun activities and while you’re here snap a selfie with a work of art!

Jessica Fuentes
C3 Gallery Coordinator

Friday Photos: Instagram + Booker T.

The DMA is now in the third year of its Learning Lab partnership with Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, a collaboration in which DMA Education staff work with Visual Arts teachers to lead experiences and projects at the DMA and at the school. The students recently completed a project that used Instagram as a means to explore artistic inspiration.  

We asked the students to choose an artist in our Modern European or Contemporary art collection and re-imagine that artist’s specific point of view in a contemporary setting. The Booker T. students did a wonderful job documenting these artistic re-imaginings by collecting images of objects, scenes, people and materials that they felt would give their particular artist inspiration.

Do you see something around you that could have been inspiration for Mark Rothko or Jasper Johns? Join the conversation on Instagram! Simply tag your images using #POVartists name. Make sure to post them in our comments section if you feel so inspired!

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,578 other followers

Twitter Updates

Flickr Photo Stream

Categories