Archive for March, 2012



First Day of Spring

It’s official, today is the first day of spring! Which means I get to do some of my very favorite things.
Like picnics and swimming
Brunch and tennis
Smelling the flowers
And wearing dresses
Playing outside and enjoying nature
Once again, it’s my favorite time of the year.

I guess there’s just something about the sunshine that makes me want to rhyme. In the spirit of the new season, I have paired a few beautiful springtime scenes from the DMA’s collection with poetry. I hope you enjoy!

River Bank in Springtime, Vincent van Gogh

Never Mind, March

Never mind, March, we know
When you blow
You’re not really mad
Or angry, or bad;
You’re only blowing the winter away
To get the world ready for April and May

~ Author Unknown
.

Early Spring in Central Park, Nicolai Cikovsky

I Meant To Do My Work Today

I meant to do my work today,
But a brown bird sang in the apple tree,
And a butterfly flitted across the field,
And all the leaves were calling me.

And the wind went sighing over the land,
Tossing the grasses to and fro,
And a rainbow held out its shining hand–
So what could I do but laugh and go?

~ Richard Le Gallienne
.

Bougival, Maurice de Vlaminick

Sunflakes

If sunlight fell like snowflakes
gleaming yellow and so bright
we could build a sunman
we could have a sunball fight.
We could watch the sunflakes
drifting in the sky
We could go sleighing
in the middle of July
through sundrifts and sunbanks
we could ride a sunmobile
and we could touch sunflakes-
I wonder how they’d feel.

~Frank Asch
.

A Host of Golden Daffodils, Charles Webster Hawthorne

Daffy Down Dilly

Daffy Down Dilly
Has come to town
In a yellow petticoat
And a green gown.

~ Mother Goose nursery rhyme
.

Jeanne: Spring, Edouard Manet

March

Dear March, come in!
How glad I am!
I looked for you before.
Put down your hat-
You must have walked-
How out of breath you are!
Dear March, how are you?
And the rest?
Did you leave Nature well?
Oh, March, come right upstairs with me,
I have so much to tell.

~ Emily Dickinson

What do you love about spring?

Hannah Burney
McDermott Education Intern for Teaching Programs and Partnerships

Artworks shown:

River Bank in Springtime, Vincent van Gogh, 1887, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McDermott in memory of Arthur Berger

Early Spring in Central Park, Nicolai Cikovsky, date unknown, lithograph, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mrs. Alfred L. Bromberg

Bougival, Maurice de Vlaminick, 1905, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

A Host of Golden Daffodils, Charles Webster Hawthorne, before 1927, oil on canvas affixed to composition board, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Edna Smith Smrz in memory of Mrs. Ed C. Smith, Sr.

Jeanne: Spring, Edouard Manet, 1882, etching and aquatint, Dallas Museum of Art, Junior League Print Fund

A “Wild” Late Night at the Dallas Museum of Art

We had a “wild” Late Night this past Friday, March 16, celebrating Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s book and the Dallas Arts District’s Spring Block Party. Visitors transformed themselves into wild things in the Art Studio, took in a circus performance by Lone Star Circus in the Atrium, listened to author Laura Numeroff discuss her Jellybeans series, met animals from the Dallas Zoo, experienced many of Dallas’s food trucks on Harwood Street, and raced through the Museum to win the DMAzing Race. We even had our own Wild Thing roaming the Museum’s Concourse. What was your favorite “wild” event?

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Have a roaring good time as we travel back to the 1920s, complete with our own Speakeasy, during April’s Late Night on Friday, April 20.

Kimberly Daniell is the PR Specialist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Friday Photo Post: Wearin' o' the Green

As a reminder to wear your green this weekend, here are are few works of art from the DMA’s collection that use shades of shamrock. Enjoy!

(Click on the first image to get a closer look at all of the works of art.)

Jessica Kennedy
McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching

Works shown:

  • Goblet, Carlo Moretti, Murano Glass Company, 1975, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Carole Stupell, Ltd.
  • Wallpaper design, Peter Todd Mitchell, mid 20th century, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Priscilla Cunningham
  • Candy jar, Gorham Manufacturing Company, Glass produced by Lindshammar Glasbruk, designed 1963, Dallas Museum of Art, The Jewel Stern American Silver Collection, Decorative Arts Fund
  • Clover with Eyes, Roberto Juarez, 1981, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Deal
  • Things the wet nurse told me, Jackie Tileston, 2003, Dallas Museum of Art, DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund
  • Landscape, Rita Leff, n.d., Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. Robert A. Beyers
  • Saturday Nite, Clementine Hunter, 1971, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Ryan
  • Magnolia Blossoms, John Breckinridge Martin, 1933, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Maggie Joe and Alexandre Hogue
  • Variant/Adobe, Josef Albers, 1947, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase
  • Ornament in the form of a feline face, Moche culture, c. A.D. 100-450, Dallas Museum of Art, The Nora and John Wise Collection, bequest of John Wise
  • Untitled, Richard Anuszkiewicz, n.d., Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan E. Boeckman
  • Summer Foliage, George Inness,1883, Dallas Museum of Art, bequest of Joel T. Howard
  • Plaque fragment with profile face, Maya culture, c. A. D. 600-900, Dallas Museum of Art, given in memory of Jerry L. Abramson by his estate
  • Fish House Door, John Frederick Peto, 1905, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase
  • Untitled (Yellow Table on Green), Hans Hofmann, 1936, Dallas Museum of Art, fractional gift of The Rachofsky Collection in honor of Dr. Dorothy Kosinski, the Barbara Thomas Lemmon Curator of European Art
  • Green Ground Blue Disc, Adolph Gottlieb, 1966, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Tucker Willis
  • “Cabbage” tureen and cover, Sceaux Factory, c. 1755, Museum of Art, gift of David T. Owsley via the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation in memory of Lucy Ball Owsley
  • Detail of Window with Starfish (“Spring”),  Louis Comfort Tiffany, Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, c. 1885-1895,Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Flat Stanley: On the Road

While Flat Stanley enjoyed his time exploring the DMA, he really had fun hitting the road with me.  I took Flat Stanley to a wedding in Ontario, Canada and to a conference in New York City.  He had fun seeing the sights and meeting my family and friends!

Crossing the Blue Water Bridge from Michigan into Canada

Crossing the Blue Water Bridge from Michigan into Canada

After crossing the bridge, Stanley waits with his passport to go through Customs

After crossing the bridge, Stanley waits with his passport to go through Customs

With a replica of the Statue of Liberty in New York

With a replica of the Statue of Liberty in New York

Flat Stanley in Times Square

Flat Stanley in Times Square

With the Empire State Building lit up in the distance

With the Empire State Building lit up in the distance

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent Programs and Gallery Teaching

An Affair of the Art: Glory of the Age

On Saturday March 3rd the DMA was transformed into a scene straight out of The Great Gatsby.

Nearly 400 of Dallas’ young professionals, members of the DMA’s Junior Associates Circle and their guests, gathered for the 19th annual gala, An Affair of the Art: Glory of the Age. The black-tie event coincided with the opening of Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties, the DMA’s new exhibition that is supported by funds raised at the event.

The Atrium was filled with dapper lads in top hats and tuxedos, and women in sparkling gowns. Dressed in garb from the era, guests revived The Charleston and danced the night away.

Mr. Gatsby himself would have been impressed.

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Jessi Moore is the Development Writer at the Dallas Museum of Art

Flat Stanley: In the Galleries

You might have noticed a small, somewhat thin, two dimensional visitor at the DMA recently. Flat Stanley has been all across our galleries, looking at and learning about many different artworks in our collection. Feel free to bring him along on your next tour!

Flat Stanley with the DMA’s Banquete chair with pandas.

Flat Stanley with the DMA’s Bed.

Flat Stanley with the DMA’s Red-figure krater.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Artworks visited by Flat Stanley:

  • Banquete chair with pandas, Fernando Campana and Humberto Campana, 2006, stuffed animals on steel base, Dallas Museum of Art, DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund, 2009.9
  • Bed, Crawford Riddell, c. 1844, Brazilian rosewood, tulip poplar, and yellow pine; Dallas Museum of Art, gift of three anonymous donors, Friends of the Decorative Arts Fund, General Acquisitions Fund, Discretionary Decorative Arts Fund, and the Boshell Family Foundation, 2000.324
  • Red-figure krater, Metope Group, c. 340-330 B.C., ceramic, pigment; Dallas Museum of Art, the Melba Davis Whatley Fund and Cecil and Ida Green Acquisition Fund, 1996.147

The Dallas Museum of Art’s Founding Women

In honor of Women’s History Month, we would like to introduce you to the founder and first four women presidents of the Dallas Art Association from the first decade of the 20th century. The Dallas Art Association (DAA) was founded in 1903 to offer art interest and education through exhibitions and lectures; to purchase works of art on a regular basis and form a permanent collection; to sponsor the work of local artists; to solicit support of the arts from individuals and businesses; and to honor citizens who support the arts. The DAA, after a number of name changes, became the Dallas Museum of Art.

Mrs. May Dickson Exall is considered to be the founder of the Dallas Art Association. In January 1903, Mrs. Exall, then president of the Dallas Carnegie Library Board of Trustees, invited all those interested to meet in the Art Room of the library to form a permanent art organization. About 80 people attended and the new organization was named the Dallas Art Association, and a 21-member board of trustee was established.

Mrs. Grace Leake Dexter was the first president of the Dallas Art Assocation for 1903, and was a board member from 1903 to 1906. Mrs. Dexter was an amateur painter and a civic leader.

From the Collection of the Texas/Dallas History and Archives Division, Dallas Public Library; Image #PA92-1/22

Mrs. Lulie Huey Lane was President in 1907. Mrs. Lane was a gifted musician with an unusually fine voice and also held leadership roles in a variety of other civic organizations.

Mrs. Robbie Buckner Westerfield was DAA president in 1908. She was also a leader in religious and women’s club work in Dallas.

1923.2 "Portrait of Mrs. George K. Meyer" by Francis Luis Mora. Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

Mrs. Sallie Griffis Meyer was president of the DAA from 1909 to 1926. Mrs. Meyer was one of Dallas’s earliest and most prominent arts patrons. In addition to her long tenure as DAA president, she was also superintendent in charge of art for the State Fair of Texas.

Discover more about the DMA’s history on the Museum’s web site.

Hillary Bober is the Digital Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.


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