Posts Tagged 'Summer Art Camp'



CosPlaying at the DMA

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This week, teens have been experimenting and creating through group and solo challenges during our Urban Armor: Cosplay Challenge Camp. Each challenge allows this group to learn new concepts and construction techniques to use in their final costume design which they showcased this afternoon in the Museum galleries. Inspired by last year’s Zombie Camp, this year’s group was visited daily by experts from various professions that they may want to pursue like film and fashion. One of the returning campers from last year, a student at Booker T. Washington, said “this (the Urban Armor camp) is the only camp that I sign up for every year because it’s so awesome. I love it.”

So if you’re in the DMA galleries this afternoon, don’t be surprised if you run into a superhero or two.


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Summer Interns: Making Art and Loving It

Creating with the Fabric Frenzy summer campers.

Creating with the Fabric Frenzy summer campers.

I tried to set few expectations for my first day of summer art camp at the DMA. Now, as the clock strikes one each Friday, I still can’t predict what will happen the next week in camp for another batch of aspiring, artistic youngsters. One thing I can feel certain of as the end of a week draws near, is that I’ve had a blast with a bunch of unique, imaginative kids and a few bottles of tempera paint.

I’ve been lucky enough to be a part of the DMA’s program that allows kids to incorporate art into their lives in fun, engaging ways with the help of some awesome and caring teachers, volunteers, and interns. These kids arrive at camp with minds teeming with creativity and energy that is infectious and inspiring for a college student trying to figure out what to do with her life and love for art. Again and again, campers teach me how to have a bit of fun in the process of art-making, while surprising me with the friendships that come along with it. So, while creating art is something special in itself, sharing it with others is a whole other experience that I’m grateful these kids and I have had this summer.

After I say a bittersweet goodbye once again today, I’ll hope that they continue to play with art and express their most imaginative ideas to the world after they leave our finger-painted doors.

Katy Freeman
Summer Art Camp Intern

Friday Photos: C3 Summer Interns

The Center for Creative Connections (C3) staff was fortunate to receive help from two high school students this summer.  Sophie Anthony, a rising senior at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, spent eight weeks working with us through the Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program.  Chloe Barreau will be a junior at the Chinese International School in Hong Kong.  She worked with C3 during a month-long visit with family.  Below are some of their experiences from this summer.

A good sense of humor is a requirement for interning with C3

Sophie and Chloe served as the first models for a photo backdrop that connects to Nic Nicosia’s photograph titled Vacation, currently on view in C3

Sophie:

Wow.  I did not realize how fast eight weeks would fly by. My internship at the DMA has been amazing — art-filled and action-packed.  Through the Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program, I got a behind-the-scenes peek into the day-to-day running of the biggest (and still expanding) art museum in town.  What a thrill!  As a high school art student, it was exciting just to be in the same building as some of the beautiful and breathtaking masterpieces housed in the Museum, not to mention the opportunity to enhance visitors’ experience with these works.  Working with visitors in C3  and behind the scenes gave me the chance to assist and interact with regular art patrons and newcomers alike, as well as see firsthand the DMA’s commitment to art education and visitor participation.

A lot of my time spent as a C3 intern was, of course, spent in C3!  C3 is a hotspot for most Museum visitors — nearly everyone who enters is excited by the relaxed and hands-on atmosphere, and leaves with their own Art Spot creation.  An extension of the C3 atmosphere is the Pop-up Art Spot, a cart filled with activities that moves through the galleries on a weekly basis.  It allows museum-goers a chance to participate with works of art more closely and see things they might not have noticed before.  Both C3 and the Pop-up Art Spot were a lot of fun because I was able to chat with visitors and learn their thoughts and perceptions on art pieces and the DMA.  I met people who had been going to the DMA for the past twenty years and people who had never visited an art museum before.  But it wasn’t all conversations — there are always plenty of supplies to be prepped!

One of my favorite projects was the July Late Night Creations activity, the “Curious Case of the Mystery Painting.”  Chloe and I made and designed the materials for the activity and wrote (not to mention re-wrote) the instructions for this mystery-themed collaborative art project.  We chose the two “mystery” paintings that would be recreated and then, after much multiplication, we gridded out the artworks into two-inch squares, which would be “clues” that participants would recreate on bigger pieces of cardboard.  Slowly, piece of cardboard by piece of cardboard, the paintings would be revealed.  The hardest part of creating this project was writing the instructions.  Chloe and I quickly learned the value of one word instead of two, realizing that the shorter and more concise, the better.  We wrote and rewrote numerous drafts until we eliminated all extraneous details and arrived at the instructions used during Late Night Creations.  When I came to work the next day and saw the final masterpieces, I was astounded.  The visitors did an amazing job in recreating the mystery paintings!  Below are the activity instructions; scroll down to see the activity in progress and completed.

All too quickly these past eight weeks have sped by.  I can’t believe how much I’ve learned, how much I’ve seen, how much I’ve done here at the DMA.  My experiences have been widely varied—I now know both how to write a set of instructions for a community art project and the most efficient way of cutting cardboard for the Art Spot.  I helped individuals with Alzheimer’s discuss pieces of art in Meaningful Moments and went behind the scenes to see exhibits go up and come down.  I became an old pro at screenprinting T-shirts through assisting with the Design Studio summer art camp and listened as teens made soundscapes based on The Museum is History exhibition during a UA Maker Club workshop.  I am so appreciative and thankful for my internship—the DMA, specifically C3, gave me a wide and varied experience in a field of work I would love to pursue.  I learned so much this summer and I’m looking forward to volunteering in C3 soon!

Chloe:

My internship experience at the DMA this summer has taught me so much about different ways in which we can enhance our appreciation of art.

I first spent two weeks assisting the New World Kids 2 summer art camp.  The classes encouraged children to create art books and stop-motion clips as well as develop back stories behind why their characters lived where they lived and the motivations behind what their characters were doing.  It was exciting for me to see how the program inspired children to construct elaborate plots and plan out each scene as if they were budding directors or playwrights.  I believe that walking children through the process of creating a story is an effective way to introduce them to the appreciation of art.  In thinking about how they would design film sets, direct the acting, and develop the characters and sub-plots, children open their minds to a wider breadth in their interpretation of art.

All great artworks have a background story, a history to the subject matter, and a thought process behind the composition. This was illustrated in the European gallery, where I had the chance to admire the art alongside our visitors, thanks to the new Pop-up Art Spot. There, visitors have fun dressing up in costumes, making gesture drawings and writing dialogues for characters using magnetic words. Each painting presents a narrative, and the visitors participate in this narrative by coordinating their facial expressions, clothing, body pose, and setting with the artwork’s composition. At this Pop-up Art Spot, I saw how these activities enlivened the experience of visitors viewing the art pieces and inspired them to imagine the story behind the art.  I see that art is not only to be admired, but to be experienced in full immersion.  We are not only audiences, but participants.

Speaking of participation in art – at July’s Late Night, Sophie and I were excited to see visitors’ reception to the “Curious Case of the Mysterious Painting” activity we worked on together.  We were thrilled that people enthusiastically lined up for their turn to contribute a clue by taking a section of an artwork poster and enlarging it on a piece of cardboard using paint. The next day I saw the mystery artworks that were recreated with the public’s contribution – the mosaics of the pieces came to life, with a beauty that can only come from a community of “artists” collaborating together for a night!

Razor LNC grid

The grid for one painting with a few squares to get it started

Visitors LNC

Visitors add to the grid

 

Bougival LNC in progress

The other painting grid, in progress

 

I have discovered that telling a story is core to the purpose of art. An artwork is a mode of communication across time, even across dynasties and cultures, and artists create an extension of themselves and share with us a part of their being.

I am really grateful for the opportunity this summer to intern at C3! The department was very welcoming, and the staff took care to educate us while giving us leeway to express ourselves and take initiative.  I loved meeting diverse people, from the speakers to the audience and members of the museum – everyday was a pleasure, and I have fond memories of my interactions and experience to bring home with me back to Hong Kong!

Thank you, Sophie and Chloe, for your very hard work this summer!  We will miss seeing your smiling faces every day.

 C3 Staff

 

Welcome 2014 Summer Art Camp Interns!

School is almost out and the temperature is rising–summer is here at the DMA! As we gear up for exciting summer programs at the Museum, we’re happy to welcome five new members to our team: our 2014 summer interns! Summer interns are an integral part of Summer Art Camps, making sure campers, teachers and parents alike are having the best educational experience possible.

Say hello to our interns! These amazing portraits were created during our orientation meeting.

Ashley artAshley Ham just completed her first year of graduate school in the Art Education program at The University of Texas at Austin. Originally from Abilene, she received a BFA in Two Dimensional Design from Abilene Christian University. And if she could be any animal she would be a bear, because she’s on a bit of a honey kick right now!Laila art

 

Laila Jiwani is a rising senior at Texas A&M University, with a focus in International Studies and French. Quite the world traveler, she spent four months studying language, culture and society at Université Moulay Ismaïl  in Meknes, Morocco. Laila’s animal of choice would be a bird, because then she wouldn’t have to pay for those flights abroad!

Miyoko art

 

Miyoko Pettinger just completed her first year at Arcadia University in Glenside, PA, where she is pursuing a degree in Psychology with an concentration in art therapy. An avid musician, she plays the piano and cello and has been a part of the Greater Dallas Youth Orchestra for 11 years! If Miyoko could be an animal she would be a sloth, because it looks like a pretty comfortable life! denise art

 

Denise Sandoval, the youngest member of the intern cohort, is a soon-to-be graduate of the Irma L. Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School in Dallas. Her plan is to study Elementary Education when she enters Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX in the fall. Perhaps her experience working at the Dallas Zoo influenced her choice of animal to-be: she chose a giraffe because they seem to be one of the nicer species.

wilhelmina artWilhelmina Watts, the second Southwestern University member of the intern group, will begin her second year of study this fall. She is pursuing a double degree in Art History and English, with a minor in Chinese. She’ll put her studio art and collage experience to use this summer during art camp. And her animal to-be of choice? A Goat. Why? Because it’s adorable!

 
 

When you visit the DMA this summer–we hope to see you often!–you’ll recognize these new faces around the Museum and the Center for Creative Connections. Say hello and welcome them to the DMA family!

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist

DIY Photo Transfer

Spring is (finally) here, which means that many of us in the education department are gearing up for Summer Art Camps! The best part of teaching a summer camp is getting to experiment and explore with materials to devise fun and engaging art projects. Jessica Fuentes and I are teaching a summer photography camp for 6-8 year olds, called Developing an Eye for Art. In this camp we are going above and beyond the simple point and shoot aspect of photography, and urging our students to explore this artistic medium through many different avenues. A favorite exploratory activity of mine is photo transfer, because it is a fairly straightforward project that invites loads of experimentation.

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What you need:

  • Photograph to transfer (higher contrast photos are best)
  • Light colored piece of wood (5×7″ is what I used)
  • Matte gel medium (found in the acrylic paints section of art & craft stores)
  • Scissors
  • Paint brush (can be foam or bristle)
  • Mod Podge (I used matte finish)
  • Access to a laser printer or copy machine

Step 1

Print your chosen photograph from a laser printer, or make a copy of the image on a photocopier. Do not use an ink jet printer, as it will smudge the image. Make sure the printed or copied image is the same size (or smaller) than your piece of wood.photo (5)

Step 2

Cut out the laser print-out of your image, making sure you do not leave a border around the image.

scissors

Step 3

Use a foam or bristle brush to place a thin layer of matte gel medium directly onto your image, which will make the image opaque white.

Brush gel medium directly onto image.

Step 4

Before the gel medium dries, place your image face down on your piece of wood. Be careful with placement as you will not be able to move the photograph once it dries.

Once your image is in place, smooth out and flatten any air bubbles underneath your photo. You can use your fingers or anything with a stiff edge (like a ruler) to smooth out any bumpy places. Make sure not to push too hard and rip your image.sandwich

Step 5

Let your photo transfer sit and dry for at least 8 hours.

Step 6

After your photo transfer has dried, get a wet rag and lay it on top of the image, making sure to get the paper nice and soaked. Next, use your fingers or a rag to carefully rub off the fuzzy white paper fibers, revealing your lovely photo underneath.

It is best to let the transfer dry in-between paper rubbings, to make sure that all the bits of paper are removed. This make take time and multiple drying and re-wetting sessions. Be patient 🙂

smush

Step 7

Once your photo transfer is dry and to your liking, brush a layer (or two) of Mod Podge on top of the image to seal the work.

That’s it! Your photo transfer is done and ready to be shown off! This simple project can be modified to give a more or less distressed look to the finished work, experiment and see what you can do!

Finished transfers.

Finished transfers.

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist

Calling all Happy Campers!

Are you dreaming of lazy days at the swimming pool, sunburned noses, family vacation, and popsicles? We are! Summer is officially 95 days away, but we won’t be spending it at the neighborhood pool. For those of us who coordinate Family Programs at the DMA, summer means one thing—Summer Art Camp! And this year’s line-up of camps has something for every creative kid. Whether you are a junior shutterbug, fashionista, sculptor, painter, designer, musician, actor, or inventor, there’s a summer camp for you.

I have been teaching summer camps at the DMA for five years now, and I’m 95 percent serious when l tell my friends that I would gladly be a full-time summer camp teacher. I love spending an entire week with a group of kids, exploring the Museum’s galleries, getting messy in the studio, and having fun. Summer camp gives both teachers and campers permission to be a little goofy, experiment with materials in crazy ways, and give our creativity a good work-out. Camp is all about F-U-N (but we usually manage to learn something along the way too).

Some of my favorite summer camp memories so far include:

Here’s a sneak peek of just a few of the things you can do at Summer Art Camp this year:

This year’s camps will be held each week June 9-27 and July 7-August 15. Morning camps are 9:00 a.m.-noon and afternoon camps are 1:00-4:00 p.m. Tickets are on sale now!

For aspiring art and museum educators, Summer Art Camps also offer the opportunity for a summer internship at the DMA. Summer camp interns get hands-on experience as they assist summer camp teachers by facilitating gallery activities, art-making projects, games, and sensory explorations. With each camp, interns step into the role of art cheerleaders, skit-planning co-conspirators, the ultimate problem solvers, and mentors to the children. What better way to spend a summer? Applications are now being accepted. Find out how to apply here.

Spend some time with us this summer at the DMA, and you’re sure to be a happy camper!

Leah Hanson
Manager of Early Learning Programs

Friday Photos: Breaking News at the DMA

WFAA Channel 8's Cynthia Izaguirre sharing newscasting tips with summer campers

WFAA Channel 8’s Cynthia Izaguirre sharing newscasting tips with summer campers

What happens when you give six to eight year olds a video camera, a sparkly pretend microphone and the chance to be newscasters for the day? The latest, breaking edition of DMA Art News! Campers in the New World Kids 2 summer art camp spent two weeks learning about how creativity comes in all shapes and sizes. One of the highlights of camp was working with WFAA Channel 8’s Cynthia Izaguirre to learn the ins and outs of broadcast news.

Shooting B-roll for our Art Newscast with Ted Forbes

Shooting B-roll for our Art Newscast with Ted Forbes

After a practice session with Cynthia, the kids were ready to roll. Ted Forbes, the Museum’s Multimedia Producer, worked his magic to help the kids get their ideas from paper to camera. The final result is this debut of the DMA Art News!

 
Leah Hanson
Manager of Early Learning Programs

Friday Photo: Expect the Unexpected

Hello all! My name is Rachel and I am one of the interns for Family Programs at the DMA this summer! I am about to start my senior year at Texas Christian University, studying Early Childhood Education and Child Development. My love of the arts and children led me to the DMA this summer and it has been quite an adventure! My favorite part has been watching the children create such wonderful works of art – never underestimate the power of a child’s creativity!

My favorite painting in the gallery is Georgia O’Keeffe’s Grey Blue & Black – Pink Circle. I love this painting because of the soft colors and swooping movement.

The piece of art that describes my time at art camp is Angry Owl, a sculpture by Pablo Picasso currently on view in the Museum’s special exhibition, Hotel Texas: An Art Exhibition for the President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy. But it’s not because the owl is angry–It’s because this piece is so unexpected for Picasso since he isn’t known for sculptures! At art camp you should always expect the unexpected! 🙂

Rachel Moss
Summer Programs Intern

Friday Photos: I Love Art

Every first day at camp starts roughly the same: the kids enter the classroom and there is a brief introduction where the students state their name, school, and a couple of things about themselves. Each time, there are more than a handful of students that say, “I love art.” You’d think it might become redundant, but honestly, it is just the opposite. With every shy, “I love art,” you can feel the passion in the room increase that much more. I am surrounded everyday by aspiring artists who not only remind me of my younger self, but also prove that creativity is abundant in the next generation.

Many of the camps look at The Guitarist by Picasso because it correlates to many different lessons. I remember one specific time when the teacher had the students do a quick sketch of the painting. I was sitting on the floor, peering at all the obscure images of what these kids perceived. It didn’t matter what their final product looked like or how accurate it was to the original–what was special about each sketch was that it was a product of an eager little brain at work.

I’ve had amazing weeks at work, even though I can hardly call it work, and the worst part is on that last day of camp when I have to say, “Goodbye.”

Julia Dankberg
Summer Programs Intern

Friday Photos: Pops of Color

GraceAnne

Hi, my name is Grace Anne and I’m one of the 4 interns this summer assisting with Art Camps at the DMA. I majored in painting and drawing at Texas Woman’s University and I am most inspired by colorful artwork.

One of my favorite pieces of art at the DMA is Soul Three by Romare Bearden. I love the pops of color juxtaposed by the black and white cutouts. I’m also a huge music fan, so I love the instruments in this work. Folk art is one of my favorite genres of artwork because of the stories that lie beneath the surface of the materials.

Another favorite painting is Bougival by Maurice de Vlaminck from the Museum’s Wendy and Emery Reves Collection. When I first saw this painting, I was captured by the vibrant, passionate colors. This painting is significant to me as a symbol of my desires and passions. My greatest passions are painting, serving people, art history, live music, outdoor adventures, and traveling the world. Working at the DMA has given me a chance to explore some of these passions more fully as I get to work alongside artists and kids in the galleries and classrooms at the Museum.

Watching the kids create so many amazing pieces of art is incredible–I am constantly astounded by their ideas and masterpieces. I couldn’t imagine a better place to be. We have the most fun at Art Camp!

Grace Anne Arnold
Summer Programs Intern


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