Posts Tagged 'Summer Art Camp'



DIY Photo Transfer

Spring is (finally) here, which means that many of us in the education department are gearing up for Summer Art Camps! The best part of teaching a summer camp is getting to experiment and explore with materials to devise fun and engaging art projects. Jessica Fuentes and I are teaching a summer photography camp for 6-8 year olds, called Developing an Eye for Art. In this camp we are going above and beyond the simple point and shoot aspect of photography, and urging our students to explore this artistic medium through many different avenues. A favorite exploratory activity of mine is photo transfer, because it is a fairly straightforward project that invites loads of experimentation.

5

What you need:

  • Photograph to transfer (higher contrast photos are best)
  • Light colored piece of wood (5×7″ is what I used)
  • Matte gel medium (found in the acrylic paints section of art & craft stores)
  • Scissors
  • Paint brush (can be foam or bristle)
  • Mod Podge (I used matte finish)
  • Access to a laser printer or copy machine

Step 1

Print your chosen photograph from a laser printer, or make a copy of the image on a photocopier. Do not use an ink jet printer, as it will smudge the image. Make sure the printed or copied image is the same size (or smaller) than your piece of wood.photo (5)

Step 2

Cut out the laser print-out of your image, making sure you do not leave a border around the image.

scissors

Step 3

Use a foam or bristle brush to place a thin layer of matte gel medium directly onto your image, which will make the image opaque white.

Brush gel medium directly onto image.

Step 4

Before the gel medium dries, place your image face down on your piece of wood. Be careful with placement as you will not be able to move the photograph once it dries.

Once your image is in place, smooth out and flatten any air bubbles underneath your photo. You can use your fingers or anything with a stiff edge (like a ruler) to smooth out any bumpy places. Make sure not to push too hard and rip your image.sandwich

Step 5

Let your photo transfer sit and dry for at least 8 hours.

Step 6

After your photo transfer has dried, get a wet rag and lay it on top of the image, making sure to get the paper nice and soaked. Next, use your fingers or a rag to carefully rub off the fuzzy white paper fibers, revealing your lovely photo underneath.

It is best to let the transfer dry in-between paper rubbings, to make sure that all the bits of paper are removed. This make take time and multiple drying and re-wetting sessions. Be patient 🙂

smush

Step 7

Once your photo transfer is dry and to your liking, brush a layer (or two) of Mod Podge on top of the image to seal the work.

That’s it! Your photo transfer is done and ready to be shown off! This simple project can be modified to give a more or less distressed look to the finished work, experiment and see what you can do!

Finished transfers.

Finished transfers.

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist

Calling all Happy Campers!

Are you dreaming of lazy days at the swimming pool, sunburned noses, family vacation, and popsicles? We are! Summer is officially 95 days away, but we won’t be spending it at the neighborhood pool. For those of us who coordinate Family Programs at the DMA, summer means one thing—Summer Art Camp! And this year’s line-up of camps has something for every creative kid. Whether you are a junior shutterbug, fashionista, sculptor, painter, designer, musician, actor, or inventor, there’s a summer camp for you.

I have been teaching summer camps at the DMA for five years now, and I’m 95 percent serious when l tell my friends that I would gladly be a full-time summer camp teacher. I love spending an entire week with a group of kids, exploring the Museum’s galleries, getting messy in the studio, and having fun. Summer camp gives both teachers and campers permission to be a little goofy, experiment with materials in crazy ways, and give our creativity a good work-out. Camp is all about F-U-N (but we usually manage to learn something along the way too).

Some of my favorite summer camp memories so far include:

Here’s a sneak peek of just a few of the things you can do at Summer Art Camp this year:

This year’s camps will be held each week June 9-27 and July 7-August 15. Morning camps are 9:00 a.m.-noon and afternoon camps are 1:00-4:00 p.m. Tickets are on sale now!

For aspiring art and museum educators, Summer Art Camps also offer the opportunity for a summer internship at the DMA. Summer camp interns get hands-on experience as they assist summer camp teachers by facilitating gallery activities, art-making projects, games, and sensory explorations. With each camp, interns step into the role of art cheerleaders, skit-planning co-conspirators, the ultimate problem solvers, and mentors to the children. What better way to spend a summer? Applications are now being accepted. Find out how to apply here.

Spend some time with us this summer at the DMA, and you’re sure to be a happy camper!

Leah Hanson
Manager of Early Learning Programs

Friday Photos: Breaking News at the DMA

WFAA Channel 8's Cynthia Izaguirre sharing newscasting tips with summer campers

WFAA Channel 8’s Cynthia Izaguirre sharing newscasting tips with summer campers

What happens when you give six to eight year olds a video camera, a sparkly pretend microphone and the chance to be newscasters for the day? The latest, breaking edition of DMA Art News! Campers in the New World Kids 2 summer art camp spent two weeks learning about how creativity comes in all shapes and sizes. One of the highlights of camp was working with WFAA Channel 8’s Cynthia Izaguirre to learn the ins and outs of broadcast news.

Shooting B-roll for our Art Newscast with Ted Forbes

Shooting B-roll for our Art Newscast with Ted Forbes

After a practice session with Cynthia, the kids were ready to roll. Ted Forbes, the Museum’s Multimedia Producer, worked his magic to help the kids get their ideas from paper to camera. The final result is this debut of the DMA Art News!

 
Leah Hanson
Manager of Early Learning Programs

Friday Photo: Expect the Unexpected

Hello all! My name is Rachel and I am one of the interns for Family Programs at the DMA this summer! I am about to start my senior year at Texas Christian University, studying Early Childhood Education and Child Development. My love of the arts and children led me to the DMA this summer and it has been quite an adventure! My favorite part has been watching the children create such wonderful works of art – never underestimate the power of a child’s creativity!

My favorite painting in the gallery is Georgia O’Keeffe’s Grey Blue & Black – Pink Circle. I love this painting because of the soft colors and swooping movement.

The piece of art that describes my time at art camp is Angry Owl, a sculpture by Pablo Picasso currently on view in the Museum’s special exhibition, Hotel Texas: An Art Exhibition for the President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy. But it’s not because the owl is angry–It’s because this piece is so unexpected for Picasso since he isn’t known for sculptures! At art camp you should always expect the unexpected! 🙂

Rachel Moss
Summer Programs Intern

Friday Photos: I Love Art

Every first day at camp starts roughly the same: the kids enter the classroom and there is a brief introduction where the students state their name, school, and a couple of things about themselves. Each time, there are more than a handful of students that say, “I love art.” You’d think it might become redundant, but honestly, it is just the opposite. With every shy, “I love art,” you can feel the passion in the room increase that much more. I am surrounded everyday by aspiring artists who not only remind me of my younger self, but also prove that creativity is abundant in the next generation.

Many of the camps look at The Guitarist by Picasso because it correlates to many different lessons. I remember one specific time when the teacher had the students do a quick sketch of the painting. I was sitting on the floor, peering at all the obscure images of what these kids perceived. It didn’t matter what their final product looked like or how accurate it was to the original–what was special about each sketch was that it was a product of an eager little brain at work.

I’ve had amazing weeks at work, even though I can hardly call it work, and the worst part is on that last day of camp when I have to say, “Goodbye.”

Julia Dankberg
Summer Programs Intern

Friday Photos: Pops of Color

GraceAnne

Hi, my name is Grace Anne and I’m one of the 4 interns this summer assisting with Art Camps at the DMA. I majored in painting and drawing at Texas Woman’s University and I am most inspired by colorful artwork.

One of my favorite pieces of art at the DMA is Soul Three by Romare Bearden. I love the pops of color juxtaposed by the black and white cutouts. I’m also a huge music fan, so I love the instruments in this work. Folk art is one of my favorite genres of artwork because of the stories that lie beneath the surface of the materials.

Another favorite painting is Bougival by Maurice de Vlaminck from the Museum’s Wendy and Emery Reves Collection. When I first saw this painting, I was captured by the vibrant, passionate colors. This painting is significant to me as a symbol of my desires and passions. My greatest passions are painting, serving people, art history, live music, outdoor adventures, and traveling the world. Working at the DMA has given me a chance to explore some of these passions more fully as I get to work alongside artists and kids in the galleries and classrooms at the Museum.

Watching the kids create so many amazing pieces of art is incredible–I am constantly astounded by their ideas and masterpieces. I couldn’t imagine a better place to be. We have the most fun at Art Camp!

Grace Anne Arnold
Summer Programs Intern

Friday Photos: Happy Feet

Making sure every kid at camp receives an enthusiastic greeting, a sincere farewell, and plenty of ecstatic responses certainly keep my mouth and feet moving at the DMA. Not everyone may start the day as a happy camper, but I believe that it’s part of my job to excite the kids by really taking interest in them and what they make. Jean Metzinger’s The Harbor best depicts my experience at the camp, both busy and energetic. From the snapshots of various scenes at the harbor, I am reminded of the various “snapshots” throughout camp filled with kids getting too close to the artwork, getting messy with finger paint, and, of course, creating some amazing artworks. By the end of each day, I am drained and exhausted, but I thank the kids for keeping me busy. I truly enjoy getting to know them each week as they become louder, wilder, and more lovable.

Sharon An
Summer Programs Intern


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