Posts Tagged 'Jean Paul Gaultier'



Friday Photos: Haute Couture at the DMA

Jean Paul Gaultier is known for his attention to even the slightest details when it comes to dressing his runway models; he often reworks and adds accessories at the very last second during his fashion shows. He understands the significance of that ever important “finishing touch”. From handbags to headbands, necklaces to neckties, accessories can transform a dull outfit into a dazzling ensemble. Our final installment of Haute Couture at the DMA highlights some of the finest accessories that the DMA has to offer.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I hope that these posts will inspire you to find your own fashion favorites the next time you visit the DMA!

Jessica Kennedy

McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching

Images used:

Sarah Badger Noyes (1747-1788), Attributed to Joseph Badger, c. 1760-1765, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Faith P. and Charles L. Bybee Collection, gift of Faith P. Bybee

Art Beauty Shoppe, Isaac Soyer, 1934, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Public Works of Art Project

Necklace, Tanjore, Tamil Nadu, India, 19th century, gold, pearls, diamonds, rubies, and emeralds, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of David T. Owsley in memory of his mother Lucy Ball Owsley via the Alconda-Owsley Foundation

Single snake armlet, Roman, 2nd century B.C., gold, chased, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum League Purchase Funds, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Cecil H. and Ida M. Green in honor of Virginia Lucas Nick

Figure of a dancer, Mohini, 10th-12th century, marble, Mount Abu area, Rajasthan, India, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation

Bust of a bodhisattva, Kushan, 2nd-3rd century, gray schist, Gandharan region, Pakistan, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Margaret J. and George V. Charlton

Manjusri, Nepal or Tibet, 18th century, gilt bronze, semiprecious stones, Dallas Museum of Art, bequest of Mrs. E.R. Brown

Spanish Woman Wearing a Black Cross, Édouard Manet, 1865, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

Pair of ear pendants, Greek, Hellenistic Greek, 2nd century B.C., gold, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum League Purchase Funds, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Cecil H. and Ida M. Green in honor of Virginia Lucas Nick

Lion head bracelet, Etruscan, Archaic Etruscan, late 6th century BC, gold, blue glass, filigree, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum League Purchase Funds, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Cecil H. and Ida M. Green in honor of Virginia Lucas Nick

“The Golden Fleece” ring, Giovanni Corvaja, 2008, 18-karat gold, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Deedie Rose

Man’s necklace (kalabubu), Nias, Indonesia, 19th Century, wood, gold, gold leaf, and brass(?), Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Nasher Foundation in honor of Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher

Folding fan with a courting scene and musical trophies, French or German, c. 1770s-1780s, gouache on double silk leaf, brass, metallic thread, mother-of-pearl, gilding, and paste gems, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

A week of Gaultier at the DMA

We held several special events for the opening of The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, not only the first exhibition on the French couturier but the first contemporary fashion exhibition for the DMA. The week started off with a “Welcome to Texas” reception for Jean Paul Gaultier presented by the members of the Jean Paul Gaultier Host Committee complete with the high-kicking Kilgore Rangerettes, country music, Stetson hats, cowboy boots, and a “Welcome to Texas” themed  tequila bar with corny dogs appetizers.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

M. Gaultier attended a Parisian luncheon with Eiffel Tower statues, pink tulle and black leather tablecloths inspired by the French Cancan ensemble worn by Carla Bruni-Sarkozy from his Ze Parisienne spring/summer 2002 Haute Couture collection located in the Skin Deep gallery of the exhibition. Later that evening excitement was in the air when M. Gaultier and Dita Von Teese entered the Museum for the Donor Circle reception greeting 700 eager guests. M. Gaultier shared stories from his childhood and entertained the fashionable dressed crowd, including the DMA’s Interim Director Olivier Meslay and curator Kevin W. Tucker in Gaultier ensembles. M. Gaultier finished his visit to the DMA on Thursday during the press preview where he discussed his inspiration and the exhibition.

Thursday was also the first opportunity for DMA members to explore the exhibition before the opening on Sunday, November 13. The Friday night General Membership reception drew over 1,500 members who dressed to impress and danced the night away to DJ Andre 7.

There are still two and half months to explore the acclaimed exhibition and number of programs to attend including a Jean Paul Gaultier themed Late Night on Friday, January, 20. For information on upcoming events, and on DMA memberships, visit DallasMuseumofArt.org.

Graffiti Couture

There are six exciting galleries inside The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk exhibition, from a red light district to a motorized runway. For the Punk Cancan room, we decided to tag the walls with details of Gaultier and Dallas with the help of graffiti artist Jerod DTOX Davies for Blunt Force Crew/Beastmode Squad. Below is a behind-the-scenes look at the tagging process.

Photography by Adam Gingrich, Dallas Museum of Art Marketing Assistant, and George Fiala.

Friday Photos: Haute Couture at the DMA

Jean Paul Gaultier is well known for his creative use of unusual materials when crafting his clothing lines. While he employs many materials that are typical  of the fashion industry, such as silk, furs, tulle, and lace, he also experiments with more uncommon items such as wheat, chicken feathers, aluminum cans, trash bags, and human hair. It is this wide use of sometimes strange materials that inspired this Friday Photos edition of Haute Couture at the DMA.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What types of materials would you use to make your own line of clothing?

Jessica Kennedy

McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching

Images used:

Pair of Lokapalas (Heavenly Guardians), early 8th century, earthenware with three color (sancai) lead glazes, China, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of, Ellen and Harry S. Parker III

Nature or Abundance (La Nature or Fécondité), Léon Frédéric, 1897, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, Mrs. John B. O’Hara Fund

Joan of Arc, Anna Hyatt Huntington, n.d., bronze, Dallas Museum of Art, Kiest Memorial Fund

Emma in a Purple Dress, George W. Bellows, 1920-1923, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

Mink and Mannequin, Reginald Marsh, 1940, watercolor, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

Portrait of Two Children, Probably the Sons of M. Almeric Berthier, comte de LaSalle, Jean-Joseph Vaudechamp, 1841, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Patsy Lacy Griffith Collection, gift of Patsy Lacy Griffith by exchange

Xipe impersonator, Aztec culture, Late Postclassic period, c. A.D. 1350-1521, volcanic stone, shell, and paint, Mexico City area, state of Mexico, Mexico, North America, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McDermott, the McDermott Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated

Takenouchi no Sukune Meets the Dragon King of the Sea, Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912), 1875-1879, bronze and glass,  Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, The John R. Young Collection, gift of M. Frances and John R. Young

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier Has Arrived

After months of preparation and anticipation, The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk is now open to the public.  The DMA’s galleries have been transformed into an immersive fashion environment, complete with singing mannequins and a moving catwalk.  I couldn’t stop saying “wow” my first time through the exhibition–I kept forgetting that I was inside the DMA.

Les Vierges collection, Apparitions dress, Haute couture, spring/summer 2007, copyright P. Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier

The exhibition celebrates a 35-year span of Gaultier’s career (from 1976 to 2011), and is divided into six distinct galleries:

  • The Odyssey of Jean Paul Gaultier, which is an introduction to Gaultier using three of his favorite motifs: sailors, mermaids, and virgins.
  • The Boudoir, which explores Gaultier’s reinterpretation of corsets and lingerie for the modern woman’s wardrobe.
  • Skin Deep, which celebrates how skin (our first garment) and its various types of decoration have inspired Gaultier.  This section is also devoted to Gaultier’s take on male fashion, including his men’s skirts.
  • Punk Cancan, which reflects the influence of Paris and London on Gaultier’s designs.
  • Metropolis, which explores the worlds of technology and science fiction.  This section of the exhibition also includes Gaultier’s collaborations with artists in the fields of film and dance.
  • Urban Jungle, which demonstrates the influence of world cultures and peoples in the fashions of Jean Paul Gaultier.

Les Actrices collection, Barbarella body-corset, Haute couture, fall/winter 2009-2010, copyright P. Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier

Of course, Jean Paul Gaultier’s name is forever tied to Madonna, and the gold corset from her Blond Ambition tour has pride-of-place in the Boudoir gallery.  The labels in the exhibition reveal a “who’s who” of other celebrities who have worn the designs in the exhibition, including Kylie Minogue, Dita von Teese, Sarah Jessica Parker, Anthony Keidis and Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Catherine Deneuve, and Beyoncé.  Several of the labels also list the number of hours required to make that particular garment.  For me, that is the most fascinating part of the exhibition.  I spend my weekends sewing, and I get annoyed if something takes me longer than a day or two to complete.  I can’t imagine spending 200+ hours working on one garment!  I guess that’s the distinction between haute couture and something home-sewn.

Les Indes galantes collection, Lascar dress, Haute couture, spring/summer 2000, copyright P. Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier

If you would like to experience The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier, I encourage you to sign up for our full-day Art & Fashion Teacher Workshop on December 3rd.  I am co-leading the workshop and we’ll explore the exhibition, as well as other examples of fashion from the DMA’s collection.  There are still spaces available, and it’s guaranteed to be a fashion-filled day (bonus points if you arrive for the workshop wearing sailor stripes). If you’re not able to join us for the Teacher Workshop, keep an eye out for Jessica’s fashion-inspired Friday Photo Posts in the month of November.

Jean Paul Gaultier's love note to Dallas

The DMA’s Uncrated blog also has a behind-the-scenes peek at Gaultier’s time at the DMA last week, including photos and video.  Of course, I also encourage you to come check out the exhibition for yourself.  This is the DMA’s first-ever fashion exhibition, and it truly is phenomenal.  Don’t let these fashions walk off the catwalk on February 12th without seeing them in person.

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent Programs and Gallery Teaching

Big Love from Jean Paul Gaultier

You may have heard that the U.S. Premiere of The Fashion World From Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk opened yesterday at the Dallas Museum of Art. But we had a week of pre-opening  events prior to Sunday, including the Press Preview on Thursday morning. Below are a few of our favorite shots from our time with the “enfant terrible”.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Kimberly Daniell, Public Relations Specialist at the Dallas Museum of Art

Friday Photos: Haute Couture at the DMA

Jean Paul Gaultier is famous for his use of nautical-esque stripes in his designs. For this installment of Haute Couture at the DMA (inspired by the exhibition opening this Sunday) let’s focus our fashion-seeking eyes on the use of patterns within works of art. I love that the idea of a pattern (a repetitive form, order, or arrangement) is so universal that cultures from around the world have been using it for centuries!

Here are just a few of the many examples that you can find in our galleries:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

These are just a few works of art that incorporate patterns. What are some of your favorites that weren’t included?

Jessica Kennedy

McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching

Images Used:

Tunic with profile heads and stepped frets, Huari culture, Middle Horizon, c. 650-800, Cotton and camelid fiber, probably south coast, Peru, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Carol Robbins’ 40th anniversary with the Dallas Museum of Art

Tunic with checkerboard pattern and stepped yoke, Inca culture, Late Horizon, A.D. 1476-1534, Camelid fiber, Peru, South America, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc. in honor of Carol Robbins

Single-spout strap-handle vessel depicting a wounded warrior, Nasca culture, Early Intermediate period, Nasca Phase 7, c. A.D. 500-600, Ceramic south coast, Peru, South America, Dallas Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund

Virgin of the Rosary, Attributed to Melchor Pérez Holguín, late 17th-early 18th century, Gold leaf with oil on canvas, Potosí, Bolivia, Dallas Museum of Art, The Cleofas and Celia de la Garza Collection, gift of Mary de la Garza-Hanna and Virginia de la Garza and an anonymous donor

Issun-Tokubei Holding a Spear, Utagawa Kunisada, 1859,Color woodcut, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Bromberg

Lise Sewing, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1866, Oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection

Helmet mask (kifwebe), Tempe-Songye peoples, late 19th to early 20th century, Wood and paint, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Africa, Dallas Museum of Art, The Clark and Frances Stillman Collection of Congo Sculpture, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Portrait of a Gentleman, possibly a Member of the Deutz Family, Michael Sweerts, 1648-1649, Oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Karl and Esther Hoblitzelle Collection, gift of the Hoblitzelle Foundation

To Corset or Not to Corset

With The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk set to open this weekend, fashion is definitely in the air at the DMA. One of the major influences you’ll find in the exhibition and in Gaultier’s work overall is the corset.  From Marie Antoinette to Madonna, for better or worse, corsets have continued to remain a big part of the female fashion arsenal. However, there is one lady in the DMA’s collection who seems to disagree with me: Sarah Sherburne Langdon.

Sarah Sherburne Langdon, John Singleton Copley, 1767. Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

In this portrait, painted in 1767, Sarah wears a loose-fitting gown without the requisite corset beneath. At that time in London, a new style was becoming all the rage partly because, just a few years before, the letters of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu were first published. Lady Montagu wrote to friends in England during her travels to Turkey after her husband had been appointed ambassador in 1716. In her letters, Lady Montagu described the odd oriental customs of the Turks, including their different styles of clothing. Upon her death, copies of the letters were widely circulated in England and the Colonies, and a craze for all things Turkish ensued.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Letters Of the Right Honourable Lady M-y W-y M-e: Written, during her Travels in Europe, Asia and Africa, To Persons of Distinction, Men of Letters, &c. in different Parts of Europe. Berlin: Sold by August Mylius, 1781. UCLA Charles E. Young Library Department of Special Collections.

So what makes Sarah’s gown Turkish, you ask? The gold embroidery trim and long, white, billowing sleeves evoked the look. But of course, her lack of corset is key. Turkish women could not imagine wearing a corset and were quite confounded by the contraption, as Lady Montagu describes. During her first visit to a local bath, the women kept encouraging her to remove her clothes. In one letter she writes, “I was at last forced to open my shirt and show them my [corset] stays, which satisfied them very well—for they believed I was so locked up in that machine, that it was not in my own power to open it, which contrivance they attributed to my husband.”

Emil Larsson, Body corset worn by Madonna, Blond Ambition World Tour, 1990. Dazed & Confused, April 2008. c. Emil Larsson

In the centuries since Lady Montagu’s letters and Sarah Sherburne Langdon’s portrait, corsets have been similarly vilified as a symbol of female oppression and embraced as a symbol of sexual empowerment. If you’d like to hear more of the corset’s story, join us on Thursday for the exhibition lecture Jean Paul Gaultier: Iconoclasm and Influence. Dr. Caroline Weber will trace the influence of the corset and other elements in Gaultier’s designs. If only Mrs. Langdon could be here to see where fashion has taken us now.

Sarah Coffey
Assistant to the Chair of Learning Initiatives

Mannequins Mouthing Off

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk features over 130 ensembles spanning 35 years of the Jean Paul Gaultier’s career. These ensembles are not simply displayed on static mannequins, but 30 of the works are placed on animated, talking mannequins (including one of Monsieur Gaultier) throughout the galleries. Below are a few behind-the-scenes shots of the installation of these lifelike mannequins. See them in person beginning this Sunday, November 13!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Friday Photos: Haute Couture at the DMA

Inspired by the Dallas Museum of Art’s upcoming show, The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, I decided to walk around the galleries and find some fashion statements within our own collection. I will start November’s Friday Photo series with a collection of hats that I think even Gaultier himself would have appreciated.

Enjoy!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jessica Kennedy

McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching

Images used:

Dorothy, John Singer Sargent, 1900, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Leland Fikes Foundation, Inc.

The Virgin of the Immaculate Conception,Unknown, late 18th century or early 19th century, Dallas Museum of Art, The Cleofas and Celia de la Garza Collection, gift of Mary de la Garza-Hanna and Virginia de la Garza and an anonymous donor

Crown with deity figures, Chavín culture, Early Horizon, c. 1000 to 200 B.C., Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.

Warrior with Shield and Bird Headdress, Mexico, state of Nayarit or state of Colima, 100 B.C. – A.D. 100, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McDermott, the McDermott Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated

Wall panel depicting Na-Bolon-K’an in ritual dress, Maya culture, Late Classic period, c. A.D. 790, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Clark

Edward Nightengale, John Smibert, c. 1722-1724, Dallas Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund and gift of Eleanor and C. Thomas May, Jr.

Portrait of a Woman, Attributed to Christian Amandus Gullager, c. 1790, Dallas Museum of Art, The Faith P. and Charles L. Bybee Collection, gift of Faith P. Bybee

Mary Harvey, Mrs. Paul Beck, Jr.,Thomas Sully, 1813, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Pauline Allen Gill Foundation

Rachel Leeds Kerr, Charles Willson Peale, 1790, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Pauline Allen Gill Foundation


Archives

Twitter Updates

Flickr Photo Stream

Categories