Posts Tagged 'Frida Kahlo'



Museum Mustaches for Movember

It’s that time of year—the leaves are starting to change colors, the weather is getting cooler, and men everywhere are starting to grow mustaches.

We are getting close to the halfway point of the monthlong event of Movember, in which men give their razors a break to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as prostate cancer.

In honor of this great month, and because I am a woman and cannot grow a ‘stache, I’ve included images of my favorite mustachioed men currently on view at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Rafael Ximeno y Planes, The Silversmith Jose Maria Rodallega, c. 1795, oil on canvas, Lent by Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andres Siegel

Rafael Ximeno y Planes, The Silversmith Jose Maria Rodallega, c. 1795, oil on canvas, Lent by Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andres Siegel

Jose Maria Rodallega, one of Mexico’s most famous silversmiths, is sporting first-week-of-Movember stubble in the Spanish Colonial Gallery on Level 4.

Jerry Bywaters, Share Cropper, 1937, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, Allied Arts Civic Prize, Eighth Annual Dallas Allied Arts Exhibition, 1937

Jerry Bywaters, Share Cropper, 1937, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, Allied Arts Civic Prize, Eighth Annual Dallas Allied Arts Exhibition, 1937

Also on Level 4 is Jerry Bywaters’ Share Cropper, who is sporting a patchy week 2 mustache, but don’t tell him I said that.

Pablo Picasso, The Guitarist, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Art Museum League Fund

Pablo Picasso, The Guitarist, 1965, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, The Art Museum League Fund

Is there a mustache in Pablo Picasso’s The Guitarist? Check out this crazy cubist painting on Level 2 and decide for yourself.

Virabhadra, Karnataka or Kerala, India, 16th–17th century, stone, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Alvin and David T. Owsley via the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation in memory of Colonel Alvin M. Owsley, with the assistance of the Wendover Fund

Virabhadra, Karnataka or Kerala, India, 16th–17th century, stone, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Alvin and David T. Owsley via the Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation in memory of Colonel Alvin M. Owsley, with the assistance of the Wendover Fund

The Hindu god Shiva is seen on Level 3 in a warlike form as Virabhadra. He has a perfectly groomed mustache fit for a god, and he gets bonus points for the super cool hat.

Charles Webster Hawthorne, The Fish and the Man, 1925, oil on canvas affixed to composition board, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

Charles Webster Hawthorne, The Fish and the Man, 1925, oil on canvas affixed to composition board, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase

Check out this epic mustache found on Level 4! Maybe by the end of Movember, many men will have a mustache as amazing as this Cape Cod fisherman’s.

Frida Kahlo, Itzicuintli Dog with Me, c. 1938, oil on canvas, Lent by Private Collection

Frida Kahlo, Itzicuintli Dog with Me, c. 1938, oil on canvas, Lent by Private Collection

Oh, Frida. You are the only woman I know who can rock a mustache! You go girl!

You can learn more about Movember and how to donate to men’s health programs by visiting the Movember Foundation’s website.

Madeleine Fitzgerald is the McDermott Education Intern for adult programming and Arts & Letters Live at the DMA.

Feliz Dia de los Muertos!

One of Mexico’s most important holidays is upon us–Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead! This popular holiday began centuries ago, and, although a celebration based on skulls and skeletons may appear a tad morbid, Dia de los Muertos is actually quite a festive and joyous time. Many of the Mesoamerican civilizations that flourished hundreds of years ago (like the Olmecs, Mayans, and Aztecs), believed strongly in the cyclical nature of life and death. This ancient belief resulted in a celebration of death, rather than a fear of itDeath is viewed as simply a continuation of life, and holidays like Dia de los Muertos are observed in order to celebrate and honor those who have passed away.

Máximo Pacheco, The Zocalo, 1929-1936

Máximo Pacheco, The Zocalo, 1929-1936

There are many things you can do to join in on the celebration this weekend.

Creating an Ofrenda – These small, personal altars honor loved ones who are no longer with us. They are decorated with flowers, candles, food, drinks, photos, and personal mementos of the person being remembered. Luckily the DMA store has many items that can beautify any ofrenda.

Decorating Gravesites – The activity of cleaning and decorating the graves of deceased loved ones has become a festive tradition, with family members congregating to adorn the sites with photographs and flowers as well as the person’s favorite food and drink. Many artists are captivated with the beauty of Mexican cemeteries and have included them in their artwork over time.

Sharing Stories about the Deceased: Part of honoring the dead is sharing stories about their life, particularly funny anecdotes. It is believed that the dead do not want to be thought of in a sad or somber way, but instead remembered and celebrated. So in this light, I wanted to celebrate and shed some light on the artist Frida Kahlo. Kahlo is most well known for her self-portraits. But of her 143 paintings, did you know that 55 are self-portraits that feature her treasured animals? After her life-changing traffic accident, Kahlo channeled her energy and emotions into her artworks and her many pets–monkeys, dogs, birds and a fawn–which lived at her home, in Coyoacán, Mexico City. To celebrate her love of animals, I placed a representation of my cat next to a bust of Kahlo.

Whether as a personal experience, family event, or social gathering, I hope that you are inspired this weekend to celebrate your loved ones as part of the Dia de los Muertos holiday!

Artworks shown:

  • Máximo Pacheco, The Zócalo, 1929-1936, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase
  • Dean Ellis, Aspect of a Mexican Cemetary, 1950, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase
  • Jerry Bywaters, Mexican Graveyard, 1939, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of A. H. Belo Corporation and The Dallas Morning News
  • Frida Kahlo, Itzcuintli Dog with Me, 1938, Private Collection

Danielle Schulz
Teaching Specialist


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