Posts Tagged 'summer fun'

Friday Photos: What Did You Learn at Camp?

With 24 camps focusing on all areas of the DMA’s collection, our summer campers sure learn a lot! In any given week, campers might learn how to mix just the right color, why Picasso portraits look so funny, the secret to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics, and much, much more. The best part is that many of these camp lessons are also life lessons. Here are a few of our favorites:

Teamwork makes the dream work.

Art (and life) can get messy… and that’s okay!

Funny faces are always in style.

When you work hard, be proud of what you accomplish!

What lessons has camp (or art!) taught you?

For a list of all our available camps, click here. You can also keep up with the fun here on the blog and through the C3 Flickr page.

Jennifer Sheppard
Teaching Specialist

 

Are you a teen? We need you!

We are now seeking applications for the 2017 Teen Ambassador Program! Since 2001, dedicated teen volunteers have assisted staff members in providing fun summer activities for families. Teen Ambassadors are trained to give tours, host story times and lead art activities in the galleries. Volunteers are closely mentored by staff members, and have several opportunities during the summer to work on special projects that impact the Museum! They also get perks with volunteering, like free parking in our garage, admission to special exhibitions, and exclusive workshops and tours. Teen Ambassadors must meet the following requirements to apply:

  • Be at least 14 years old and have completed the 8th grade, or equivalent;
  • Have an interest in art, museums, or public service;
  • Willing to practice public speaking skills;
  • Able to commit to volunteering at least 20 hours over the summer.

Does this describe you or a teenager you know? Click here to apply today! We will accept applications until Saturday, April 29, 2017. More information about Teen Ambassadors and all our teen programs is available on our Teen Programs page. Please feel free to email Jessica Thompson with any questions.

Jessica Thompson
Manager of Teen Programs

Beyond the Coloring Book

Coloring Book 1

Adult coloring books are all the rage right now, and the perfect relaxing activity to take a break from your spreadsheets at work, the laundry piling up at home, or that never-ending to do list. If you don’t really want to share your coloring books with the kids, here are some creative, easy ideas that go beyond the coloring book.

Coloring Book 3

Graph Paper Drawing
A couple years ago, one of the few things on my nephew’s Christmas wish list was graph paper. He was genuinely thrilled to open up a gridded white board, and got to work right away creating all kinds of designs. If a blank piece of paper is too overwhelming for your child, graph paper drawing is a great alternative. The preprinted lines and shapes provide just enough structure while still allowing for open-ended expression. You can download and print your own graph paper in all kinds of designs, from regular squares to triangles, circles, hexagons, and more, here.

Coloring Book 4

Scribble Drawings
Scribble drawings are still one of my very favorite ways to doodle. Simply scribble a line (or two or MANY) on your paper and then fill in the spaces with color for a fun abstract design. Or, step back, take a closer look at your doodle and see if any images materialize. Can you see a face? A tail? Fill in the appropriate spaces to finish out what your imagination sees in the lines.

Coloring Book 5

Back and Forth Drawings
Turn coloring time into together time by playing simple drawing games together. Tangle Art & Drawing Games for Kids has tons of creative ideas. We tried “Horizon Drawings” here in the office. I drew a wacky horizon line on a piece of paper, then handed it off to Jennifer, who turned it into these delightfully kooky characters. Can’t you just imagine the story that is happening here?

Surreal Drawings
Surreal drawings are another imagination-builder. Start off with an everyday object—clip pictures from recycled magazines or print images from the internet. Challenge your child to transform that object into something new by drawing. Characters are an easy place to begin—a carrot turns into a basketball player, an egg beater becomes a charming friend.

Coloring Book 8

Pokemon Go Unplugged
When it’s time to unplug and disconnect, your kids can still burn off their Pokemon Go steam with a little old-fashioned drawing. Have everyone in the family invent and draw their own Pokemon Go character and hide it somewhere in the house or yard. Call “ready, set, go” and race to see who can collect the most characters.

For more great drawing ideas, check out these links:

Fun drawing games at The Artful Parent

All kinds of drawing prompts from TinkerLab

Drawing game using household objects from Craftwhack

And ten more drawing games from Craftwhack

Happy coloring!

Leah Hanson
Manager of Family and Early Learning Programs


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