Posts Tagged 'Lunar New Year'

Happy Chinese New Year

Today is the start of Chinese New Year, or Lunar New Year. Traditionally, this day marks the beginning of the plowing and sowing season, but this festive holiday also celebrates new life. All over the world, people are celebrating the Incoming Year of the Horse. So we rounded up some of our own horse artworks to kick off the Lunar New Year. Come visit our fabulous fillies tomorrow and then join in the celebration at the Crow Collection’s annual Chinese New Year Festival!

Artworks shown:

    • Antoine–Louis Barye, Turkish Horse, c. 1838, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, Mrs. John B. O’Hara Fund
    • Polo horse tomb figure, China, 618-907 A.D., Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rothwell
    • Harrison Begay, Indian Woman on Horse, 1952, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association Purchase
    • Horse-and-rider figure (elesin Shango), Yoruba peoples, Africa, Nigeria, Owo, 17th to 18th century, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc.
    • Bank Langmore, Horse Silhouette, Bell Ranch, New Mexico, 1974, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Paul Brauchle
    • Horse and rider, Boeotia, Greek, 6th century B.C., Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Clark
    • Cynthia Brants, Horse and Rider, n.d., Dallas Museum of Art, Creative Arts Guild fund, Seventh Southwestern Exhibition of Prints and Drawings, 1957
    • Deborah Butterfield, Horse #6-82, 1982, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, Edward S. Marcus Fund
    • Anthony Gross, Horse Bath, 1954, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Bromberg

Andrea Severin Goins
Interpretation Specialist

Gung Hay Fat Choy!

Happy Chinese New Year! Gung hay fat choy means “Wishing you a prosperous year” in Cantonese. Sunday, February 10, marked the beginning of a new year according to the lunar calendar. Chinese New Year is also known as Lunar New Year and is celebrated in many other Asian countries. It falls in the month of January or February on the first day of the first moon. In China, each year is represented by one of the twelve animals of the Zodiac. 2013 is the year of the Snake. If you were born in 2001, 1989, 1977, 1965, 1953, or 1941, then you were born in the year of the Snake (but those of you with January and February birthdays should double check!).

Celebrations range from one day to fifteen days, and traditions vary from region to region and family to family. My family celebrated by giving each other red envelopes filled with small gifts of money. These were given out by the adults to the children as a symbol of luck and good fortune. Houses are often decorated with red and gold lanterns and banners, and festivities typically include a special family meal. Noodles represent long life, while fruits, such as tangerines and kumquats, symbolize wealth. My family bought peaches, a traditional Chinese symbol of longevity.

On the inner wall are six panels containing stylized peach branches. The peach is believed to ward off evil and represents springtime, marriage, and immortality.

On the inner wall are six panels containing stylized peach branches. The peach is believed to ward off evil and represents springtime, marriage, and immortality.

Celebrate the Lunar New Year with friends and family at some of these DFW area events, including a free Year of the Snake Celebration with our neighbor, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, on Late Night. Wishing you a happy and healthy new year from all of us at the DMA!

Fu is the Chinese word for good luck. Typically, it is hung upside down. The Chinese word for “upside-down” sounds like the Chinese word for “arrive.” So when the sign is hung upside-down, it wishes for good fortune to arrive soon.

Fu is the Chinese word for good luck. Typically, it is hung upside down. The Chinese word for “upside-down” sounds like the Chinese word for “arrive.” So when the sign is hung upside-down, it wishes for good fortune to arrive soon.

Works shown:

  • Roman, Single Snake Armlet, 2nd century BC, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum League Purchase Funds, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Cecil H. and Ida M. Green in honor of Virginia Lucas Nick.
  • China, Jingdezhen, Bowl, c. 1640-1650, Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection.

Alex Vargo
McDermott Intern for Gallery Teaching


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