Posts Tagged 'Provocative Comparisons'

Get Schooled at the DMA

Want to explore the DMA’s collection or special exhibitions before the Museum is open to the public all while earning CPE hours? Our Teacher Workshops give you an opportunity to do just that. Held on select Saturdays from 9:00 am—12:30 pm, K-12 teachers of all disciplines are invited to join us for conversations and interactive gallery experiences. We are hosting three workshops this fall, and the links below take you directly to registration information.

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Provocative Comparisons: A New Approach to Teaching with Artworks
Saturday, October 12

Discover new and unexpected connections across the Museum. Teachers will contemplate thought-provoking cross-cultural comparisons in the DMA’s encyclopedic collection. This workshop presents a new way to frame conversations about artworks, and teachers will gain access to resources and tools they can use in their classroom.

Jim Hodges, Untitled (Gate), 1991, copyright Jim Hodges

Jim Hodges, Untitled (Gate), 1991, © Jim Hodges

Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take
Saturday, November 2

Contemporary artist Jim Hodges excels at poetic gestures of conceptual art using materials that range from the everyday to the precious. Teachers will have the unique opportunity to explore the ephemeral nature of Hodges’ work. We will also investigate themes of relationships, beauty, and transformation throughout Hodges’ career.

Edward Hopper, Study for Nighthawks, 1942, Whitney Museum of American Art, copyright Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital Image, copyright Whitney Museum of American Art, NY

Edward Hopper, Study for Nighthawks, 1942, Whitney Museum of American Art, © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital Image, © Whitney Museum of American Art, NY

Hopper Drawing: A Painter’s Process
S
aturday, December 7

Discover the creative process of American artist Edward Hopper. Teachers will participate in gallery dialogues and hands-on art experiences as we explore drawings, watercolors, prints, and paintings from across Hopper’s career. We will also trace the evolution from sketch to finished painting.

Educators Block Party logo

The DMA is also participating in a brand new Educator Block Party, being held in the West End this Thursday, October 3rd, from 4:00-8:00 p.m. Teachers of all disciplines are invited to stop by The Sixth Floor Museum, The Old Red Museum, the Dallas Holocaust Museum, and the Perot Museum of Nature and Science to learn more about the different cultural organizations in Dallas county. Each organization will have a booth where you can learn about field trips, outreach programs, and even more teacher workshops. Admission to enter the Educator Block party is FREE, but you must bring a school ID with you to be able to participate. We hope you’ll stop by and say hello!

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent and Teacher Programs

Friday Photos: African Headwear

As I’ve mentioned before on our blog, I love the DMA’s African collection.  Below are photos of some of my favorite hats in African Headwear: Beyond Fashion, an exhibition currently on view at the Museum.  Some of these hats are from the DMA’s collection, but there are also many loans and new acquisitions in the exhibition.  I think my absolute favorite is the Royal Messenger’s Headdress from Cameroon.  I love the bold shape and purple dye!

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I’m looking forward to the arrival of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk in November–I think it will be fun to compare his fashion designs with some of the works of art in African Headwear.  I already have ideas for our next installment of Provocative Comparisons!

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent Programs and Gallery Teaching

Friday Photos: Provocative Comparisons Part Three

Ecce Homo, c. 1615-1620, Giulio Cesare Procaccini (Italian, 1574-1625), Oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated

El Hombre, 1953, Rufino Tamayo (Mexican, 1899-1991), Vinyl with pigment on panel, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association commission, Neiman-Marcus Company Exposition Funds

This is the final post in our photo series focused on Provocative Comparisons.  My experiences looking at these two paintings with out-of-town visitors led to powerful conversations about scale, the male figure, religion and beliefs, color, composition, and aspirations.  We wondered about the impact of these works on those who experienced them originally, shortly after their initial creation, and compared our thoughts on this to our own reactions as 21st century viewers.  I invite you to take a long look at Rufino Tamayo’s El Hombre and Procaccini’s Ecce Homo.  What do you see?  What do you think about?  What relationships between the two, if any, resonate with you?

Nicole Stutzman
Director of Teaching Programs and Partnerships

Friday Photos: Provocative Comparisons Part Two

Last week, Shannon introduced one of our 9×9 experimental programs, Provocative Comparisons.  On Saturday, I led our second Provocative Comparisons conversation focused on She, an onyx sculpture by Bosnian-French artist Bojan Šarčević, and The Icebergs, by American painter Frederick Church.  My conversation with two visitors while looking at these works of art was rather delightful, as we all shared our observations, questions, and ideas about these artworks.  I especially loved seeing new aspects of these artworks and new connections through the eyes of my partners.  What connections can you find between these two works of art?

Bojan Šarčević, She, 2010, Dallas Museum of Art, DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund, 2011.4

Bojan Šarčević, She, 2010, Dallas Museum of Art, DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund, 2011.4

Frederic Church, The Icebergs, 1861, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Norma and Lamar Hunt, 1979.28

Tomorrow, Nicole will lead Provocative Comparisons with two more works of art.  Below is a sneak peek…to see its counterpart, join Nicole on Saturday, July 30, at 3:00 or 7:00 p.m.

Rufino Tamayo, El Hombre, 1953, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Association commission, Neiman-Marcus Company Exposition Funds, 1953.22

Melissa Nelson
Manager of Teaching in the Community

Friday Photos: Provocative Comparisons

Last weekend, the Museum launched an experimental summer program: 9×9.  For nine days in July, the Museum will stay open later than usual (until 9:00 p.m.) and will offer a variety of new and fun programs.  The program I am most excited about is Provocative Comparisons.  Offered on Saturdays at 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., Provocative Comparisons encourages participants to look closely, contemplate, and converse about two works of art in the collection.  Through these conversations, we begin to discover meaning and connections that tie these works of art together.

I led the first Provocative Comparisons session this past Saturday, and we looked at a Shield Cover and Shield in Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection, as well as Jackson Pollock’s Portrait and a Dream.  What connections can you find between these two works of art?

Shield Cover and Shield, Apsáalooke (Crow) people, Montana, ca. 1860, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y.

Jackson Pollock, Portrait and a Dream, 1953, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1967.8

Join Melissa on July 23rd at 3:00 and 7:00 for the next installment of Provocative Comparisons.  To whet your appetite, here’s a preview of one of the works of art that will be discussed.  What work of art from the DMA’s collection would you compare with She?

Bojan Šarčević, She, 2010, Dallas Museum of Art, DMA/amfAR Benefit Auction Fund, 2011.4

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent Programs and Gallery Teaching


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