Posts Tagged 'gold'

Look to the End of the Rainbow

According to legend, every Leprechaun has a pot of gold, secreted deep in the Irish countryside. In order to keep their treasure safe, the Irish fairies gave the Leprechauns magic to use in case of capture. The fairy magic allowed them to grant three wishes or to vanish into thin air!

Based on these tales, it seems that Dallas has a Leprechaun of its own. The DMA is filled with an abundance of gold representing numerous lands over many years, something very magical indeed. All of the gold is carefully protected by fairies . . . ahemm . . . I mean gallery attendants. You can look, but don’t touch! That would make our mischievous Leprechauns . . . I mean curators . . . very upset.

If you happen to spot a rainbow this afternoon, don’t be surprised if it leads you right here, to Dallas’s biggest pot of gold!

Pot of Gold Take 2

Images: Gerd Rothmann, neckalace, n.d., Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Edward W. and Deedie Potter Rose, formerly Inge Asenbaum collection, gallery Am Graben in Vienna, © Gerd Rothmann, 2014.33.284; Bruno Martinazzi, bracelet, 1969, gold and silver, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Edward W. and Deedie Potter Rose, formerly Inge Asenbaum collection, gallery Am Graben in Vienna, © Bruno Martinazzi, 2014.33.353; Graduated shell dish, Fitz & Floyd, Chunichi Toki Company, 1983, porcelain and gilding, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Robert C. Floyd, 1998.129.1; Velma Davis Dozier, pin, 1969, cast gold with diamonds, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Otis and Velma Dozier, © Denni Davis Washburn, William Robert Miegel Jr, and Elizabeth Marie Miegel, 1979.25; Jaguar effigy, A.D. 800-1200, gold, Dallas Museum of Art, The Nora and John Wise Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jake L. Hamon, the Eugene McDermott Family, Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, and Mr. and Mrs. John D. Murchison, 1976.W.261; Pendant with two figures, A.D. 700-1520, gold-copper alloy (tumbaga), Dallas Museum of Art, The Nora and John Wise Collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jake L. Hamon, the Eugene McDermott Family, Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, and Mr. and Mrs. John D. Murchison, 1976.W.245; Cow’s head stirrup cup. n.d., glazed earthenware and paint, Dallas Museum of Art, the Patsy Lacy Griffith Collection, bequest of Patsy Lacy Griffith, 2001.134; Single snake armlet, 1st century A.D., gold, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum League Purchase Funds, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., and Cecil H. and Ida M. Green in honor of Virginia Lucas Nick, 1991.75.92.1; Scissors, 20th century, brass, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Elizabeth Weaver, 1993.68.97; Ring, Claus Bury, 1971, gold and acrylic, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Edward W. and Deedie Potter Rose, formerly Inge Asenbaum collection, gallery Am Graben in Vienna © Claus Bury, 2014.33.45

Julie Henley is the Communications and Marketing Coordinator at the DMA.

Friday Photo Post

For this week’s Friday Photo Post, I focused on works of art in the collection made of silver and gold. I decided to do this after singing Silver and Gold from Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer on the way to work. All objects can be found on the third floor of the Museum.

Amy Wolf
Coordinator of Gallery Teaching

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New Acquisitions in African Collection

Two works of art from the Asante peoples in Ghana are now part of the DMA’s collection and are currently on view in the African galleries.  Both works of art were made for Asante chiefs and relate to proverbs.

The Linguist Staff has a finial which refers to an Asante proverb that states, “one who climbs a good tree always gets a push,” that is, if a chief’s intentions are good and fair, he will have the support of his people.  A ruler owns several linguist staffs in order to display the one that best visualizes the message he wishes to convey to his people at a particular time.

The Sword ornament in the form of a lion is a hollow cast gold sculpture.  Similar to linguist staff finials, the imagery on sword ornaments is meaningful.  The lion, for example, is an emblem for the bravery of the chief.  A proverb states, “If the lion has no intention to attack, it will not show its teeth before you,” advising a person to heed the warnings of a chief.  This lion’s teeth are bared.

Visit the Museum soon to see these new acquisitions!

Molly Kysar
Head of Teaching Programs

Linguist staff (okyeame poma), Ghana, Asante peoples, first half of 20th century, wood and gold leaf, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., 2010.1.McD

Linguist staff (okyeame poma) (detail), Ghana, Asante peoples, first half of 20th century, wood and gold leaf, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., 2010.1.McD

 Sword ornament in the form of a lion, Ghana, Nsuta State, Asante peoples, c. mid-20th century, cast gold and felt, Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., 2010.2.McD


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