Posts Tagged 'docent-guided tours'



Intern Project: Introduction to Me & My World

Me & My World is an hour-long education program for first graders. We offer it as a docent-guided tour as well as a Go van Gogh classroom experience. Both programs introduce students to artwork in our collection with:

Both programs give the first-graders an opportunity to create artwork to take home with them at the end of the museum visit or school day. The overall goal is to assist the students in looking carefully at various works of art and making personal connections to them.  Because the settings are different (Museum galleries vs. school classroom) the experiences with works of art vary. Here is an example for Mary Cassatt’s Sleepy Baby from Go van Gogh:

Sleepy Baby, Mary Cassatt c. 1910, pastel on paper, Dallas Museum of Art, Munger Fund

Clues: a piece of a pink blanket, a pacifier, and the arm gesture of rocking a baby

After a conversation about the mother and baby (“Have you ever held a baby? Do you have a baby brother or sister at home? Have you ever sat on someone’s lap? How did it feel?”) a brief poem is read aloud to the class:

Human Pillow
By Sondra Falck

A sleepy head lay yawning,
Quietly on my chest,
His little legs were tired,
Needing a bit of rest.

Little boy, face filled with dreams,
Of all he planned to do,
Games to play and trees to climb,
Before this day was through.

 Busy dreamer, sound asleep,
Had to find the softest lap,
To be his human pillow,
So he could take a nap.

As a class, we discuss connections between the poem and the work of art. Then, we create a poem of our own, by asking the students to finish the sentence “Babies are ___”. When completed, it will look something like this: 

Babies are _soft_.
Babies are ­­­_sweet_.
Babies are _loud_.
Babies are _smelly_.
Babies are _squishy_.
Babies are _sleepy_.

Here is an example of Romare Beardon’s Soul Three from the Docent Tour:

Soul Three, Romare Bearden, 1968, paper and fabric collage on board, Dallas Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund and Roberta Coke Camp Fund

Soul Three, Romare Bearden, 1968, paper and fabric collage on board, Dallas Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund and Roberta Coke Camp Fund

 

Clues: Detail of cloth from the collage, a foot tapping, and a tambourine

There are two themes that can be brought up during this conversation: one highlights what the students see in the painting (patterns, shapes, colors, figures) and the other explores the relationship of the people and the activity that they are participating in.

After this conversation, the students are encouraged to create a story about these three friends by considering the following prompts:

  • Give each of the gentlemen and the lady a name.
  • How did they meet each other?
  • What kind of music do they like to play?
  • Where are they playing their music?
  • Who is listening to them play? Are there other people around?
  • What happens when they stop playing their music?

The activity encourages the students to pose like one of the figures in the work of art and then choose one part of their body to move when the docent claps out a rhythm. Since we love working with children of all ages, we have decided to revise both of the Me &  My World programs as our McDermott Intern Project. We are still in the brainstorming stage, and we would love your help!

What are some of your favorite works of art from the DMA collection to use with young visitors? Has our collection inspired any fun activites that you use with your students? Tell us in the comments!

Jessica Kennedy & Hannah Burney
McDermott Interns for Teaching Programs and Partnerships

Educator Resources: Funding for Field Trips

One of the best ways to connect your students with art and the cultures they’ve been learning about in the classroom is to bring them to the Museum.  Each year Museum staff and docents tour hundreds of students from the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, and school tours are one of the most enjoyable aspects of our days.  The Museum is entirely FREE for students, teachers, and their chaperones on school tours, and the only cost to you is your bus.  We realize that even the cost of a bus can limit you and your students’ ability to visit the Museum.  So, we’d like to share several opportunities to subsidize the cost of your transportation to and from the Museum.

1. Target Field Trip Grants

Target launched its grant program in 2007 and has awarded almost $10 million in grants, allowing students and teachers from all fifty states to extend the classroom to the world of museums, historical sites, and cultural organizations.  Each Target store awards three grants up to $700 to K-12 schools nationwide.  Applications for the 2011-2012 school year open August 1st!

2. DART Transit Education

DART’s Community/Education Outreach Program provides support for public and private schools, grades 1-12 in thirteen DFW-area cities.  The program offers a twenty-minute on-site presentation about public transportation, safety, and rules of conduct.  Then, classes can be transported FREE to a number of different Dallas sites, including the Arts District and Fair Park.  For more information and to schedule a program, see the DART site.

The Museum offers both docent-guided and self-guided  tours, which can be scheduled online.  Museum visits for the 2011-2012 school year can be reserved beginning in August, and request forms will be available online.  The calendar does fill quickly, so please schedule programs as early as possible.  We look forward to seeing you and your students at the Museum!

Ashley Bruckbauer
McDermott Intern for Teaching Programs and Resources

Coming Soon: The Thaw Collection

It has been nearly twenty years since the Dallas Museum of Art hosted an exhibition of Native American art.  All of that will change on April 24th when Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection opens.  The exhibition features 135 works of art collected by Eugene and Clare Thaw, whose collection now resides at the Fennimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection will be arranged by geographic region, and will include works of art from the Northwest Coast, Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, Arctic, California, and Great Basin regions.  One of the artworks I am most excited to see in person is a horse mask made by the Nez Perce people.  I am intrigued by the bright colors and intricate beadwork designs, and I can’t wait to include the horse mask on our summer tours.  I’m also looking forward to learning more about the DMA’s collection of American Indian art through connections with the Thaw collection.

Horse Mask, c. 1875-1900, Nez Perce or Cayuse, Idaho, Oregon, or Eastern Washington, Thaw Collection, Fennimore Art Museum, photograph by John Bigelow Taylor

We have a very limited number of docent-guided visits to the exhibition available in the month of May.  If you are interested in bringing your students to see the exhibition before the end of the school year, submit an Online Visit Request Form today!   Students receive free admission to the exhibition when a visit is scheduled at least three weeks in advance.  We will include the exhibition on our summer tours and are creating a Go van Gogh Summer Library Program around the exhibition.  We look forward to sharing Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection with you and your students this spring!

Shannon Karol
Manager of Docent Programs and Gallery Teaching


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